Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



Plumbago_9780993198359_1.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Commentary

Bampton Classical Opera to perform Gian Carlo Menotti's Amahl and the Night Visitors

Gian Carlo Menotti’s much-loved Christmas opera, Amahl and the Night Visitors was commissioned in America by the National Broadcasting Company and was broadcast in 1951 - the first-ever opera composed specifically for television. Menotti said that it “is an opera for children because it tries to recapture my own childhood”.

Kings College, Cambridge launches as curator on Apple Music

November 5, 2018, Los Angeles, CA: Today, King’s College Cambridge announces the launch of the College as a curator on Apple Music.

Royal Opera House’s Music Director Sir Antonio Pappano extends tenure to 2023

Sir Antonio Pappano, Music Director of the Royal Opera House, has confirmed that he will remain in position until at least the end of the 2022/23 Season.

Boston Early Music Festival Chamber Opera to Present Caccini’s Alcina

The GRAMMY-Winning Boston Early Music Festival Chamber Opera Series presents Francesca Caccini’s Alcina on Thanksgiving weekend – November 24 & 25 in Boston and November 26 & 27 in New York City

The Royal Opera House lets everyone in on the act

The Royal Opera House today opens the doors to its transformed new home, following an extensive three-year construction project.

Two of Garsington Opera's 2018 productions to reach a wider audience

Garsington Opera is delighted to announce that on Saturday 6 October, BBC Radio 3’s ‘Opera on 3’, will broadcast the production of its first festival world premiere - The Skating Rink by David Sawer set to a libretto by Rory Mullarkey based on a novel by Chilean author Roberto BolaƱo.

Remembering and Representing Dido, Queen of Carthage: an interview with Thomas Guthrie

The first two instalments of the Academy of Ancient Music’s ‘Purcell trilogy’ at the Barbican Hall have posed plentiful questions - creative, cultural and political.

Bampton Classical Opera Goes to the Ball

I wonder if Cinderella realised that when she found her Prince she would also find international fame, becoming not just a Princess but also a global celebrity and icon. The glass slipper, placed loving on her shapely foot, has graced theatres, variety halls, cinema screens and opera houses - even postage stamps - and the perennial popularity of this rags-to-riches fairy-tale, in which innocence and goodness triumph over injustice and oppression, shows no signs of waning.

Glyndebourne announces new Artistic Director

Stephen Langridge has been appointed Artistic Director of Glyndebourne. Stephen is currently Director for Opera and Drama at Gothenburg Opera, Sweden, a role he has occupied for five years. He will take up his new role at Glyndebourne in spring 2019.

Beyond Gilbert and Sullivan: Edward Loder’s Raymond and Agnes and the Apotheosis of English Romantic Opera

Mention ‘nineteenth-century English opera’ to most people, and they will immediately think ‘Gilbert and Sullivan’. If they really know their Gilbert and Sullivan, they’ll probably remember that Sullivan always wanted to compose more serious operas, but that Gilbert resisted this, believing they should ‘stick to their last’: light, comic, tuneful satire.

Mascagni's Isabeau at Opera Holland Park: in conversation with David Butt Philip

Opera directors are used to thinking their way out of theatrical, dramaturgical and musico-dramatic conundrums, but one of the more unusual challenges must be how to stage the spectacle of a young princess’s naked horseback-ride through the streets of a city.

The Moderate Soprano : Q&A with Nancy Carroll and Roger Allam

Nancy Carroll and Roger Allam play Audrey Mildmay and John Christie in David Hare’s play The Moderate Soprano which is currently at the Duke of York’s Theatre in London.

Soprano Nadine Sierra Wins the 2018 Beverly Sills Artist Award

Soprano Nadine Sierra has been named the winner of the 13 th annual Beverly Sills Artist Award for young singers at the Metropolitan Opera.

The Grand Tour: A European Journey in Song

The seventeenth Oxford Lieder Festival (12-27 October 2018) will celebrate a rich tapestry of music, words and performance in European song and will showcase the pinnacles of the repertoire while exploring wider cultural influences.

An Interview with Soprano Lisette Oropesa

Lisette Oropesa sings Eurydice in Los Angeles Opera’s French version of Gluck’s Orpheus and Eurydice that can currently be seen at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.

Opera in Amsterdam in 2018-2019

The operatic tradition is not as old in the Netherlands as in other European countries, yet opera is a vital part of the Dutch classical landscape. Both Dutch National Opera & Ballet and the Concertgebouw are in Amsterdam, so the capital gets the lion’s share of the opera on offer.

Lyric Opera of Chicago to Premiere Fellow Travelers—A Preview

On 17 March 2018 Lyric Opera of Chicago will premiere the 2016 opera Fellow Travelers by Gregory Spears (with a libretto by Greg Pierce, based on the novel by Thomas Mallon. Mallon’s 2007 novel offered fresh perspectives on the paranoiac investigations of McCarthy-era Washington, DC, through the lens of a gay relationship.

A newly discovered song by Alma Mahler

It is well known that in addition to the fourteen songs by Alma Mahler published in her lifetime, several dozen more - perhaps as many as one hundred - were written and have been lost or destroyed.

Glyndebourne Opera Cup 2018: semi-finalists announced

The semi-finalists for the first Glyndebourne Opera Cup have been announced. Following a worldwide search that attracted nearly 200 entries, and preliminary rounds in Berlin, London and Philadelphia, 23 singers aged 21-28 have been chosen to compete in the semi-final at Glyndebourne on 22 March.

ENO announces Studio Live casts and three new Harewood Artists

English National Opera (ENO) has announced the casts for Acis and Galatea and Paul Bunyan, 2018’s two ENO Studio Live productions. ENO Studio Live forms part of ENO Outside which takes ENO’s work to arts-engaged audiences that may not have considered opera before, presenting the immense power of opera in more intimate studio and theatre environments.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Commentary

06 Oct 2004

Le Figaro Interviews Felicity Lott

Deux reprises, des tournées, un DVD, le prix de la critique : La Belle Hélène par le tandem Minkowski/Pelly fut l’un des plus grands et des plus durables succès du Châtelet. De quoi donner envie de reconduire l’équipe gagnante dans un autre Offenbach : ce sera La Grande Duchesse de Gérolstein. Mais à une condition : que la vedette en soit à nouveau Dame Felicity Lott, la plus française des chanteuses britanniques, dont la classe et le naturel s’imposent de l’opérette viennoise à l’opéra-bouffe français, en passant par la nostalgie du Chevalier à la rose ou le désespoir de La Voix humaine. Nous avons rencontré cette femme délicieuse début septembre, juste avant que le spectacle n’inaugure la nouvelle salle de Grenoble, «rodage» précédant les représentations parisiennes.

Felicity Lott : "J'ai besoin qu'on m'aime"

Deux reprises, des tournées, un DVD, le prix de la critique : La Belle Hélène par le tandem Minkowski/Pelly fut l'un des plus grands et des plus durables succès du Châtelet. De quoi donner envie de reconduire l'équipe gagnante dans un autre Offenbach : ce sera La Grande Duchesse de Gérolstein. Mais à une condition : que la vedette en soit à nouveau Dame Felicity Lott, la plus française des chanteuses britanniques, dont la classe et le naturel s'imposent de l'opérette viennoise à l'opéra-bouffe français, en passant par la nostalgie du Chevalier à la rose ou le désespoir de La Voix humaine. Nous avons rencontré cette femme délicieuse début septembre, juste avant que le spectacle n'inaugure la nouvelle salle de Grenoble, "rodage" précédant les représentations parisiennes.

Propos recueillis par Christian Merlin
[05 octobre 2004]

Felicity Lott

LE FIGARO. - En pleines répétitions de La Grande Duchesse, comment vous sentez-vous ?

Felicity LOTT. - Je me sens nulle, comme d'habitude. Mais ce n'est pas nouveau, j'avais déjà eu la meme impression au début du travail sur La Belle Hélène. J'ai tellement de texte à dire en français, je dois chanter et jouer en meme temps : on ne peut se permettre une seconde d'inattention. Je regarde François Le Roux, Yann Beuron, Sandrine Piau, je les trouve formidables et je me dis : je n'y arriverai jamais, qu'est-ce que je fais là ? Je dois etre pénible pour les autres, avec mes complexes. Ils ont certainement suffisamment de problèmes pour ne pas avoir en plus à subir les miens !

Vous semblez pourtant si à l'aise en scène ! Qu'est-ce qui vous permet de surmonter votre manque de confiance en vous ?

La confiance des autres. J'aimerais etre plus forte et me porter toute seule, mais c'est ainsi : j'ai besoin d'etre soutenue par les autres. La clé, c'est le travail d'équipe : je suis incapable de considérer mon métier comme une activité individualiste. C'est pourquoi, par exemple, j'aime beaucoup donner des récitals à deux, que ce soit avec ma complice Ann Murray ou avec Angelika Kirchschlager, dont j'aime tant le naturel et la spontanéité. Ici, pour un spectacle comme La Grande Duchesse, on est porté par l'équipe Minkowski/Pelly, qui est comme une famille.

Qu'est-ce qui vous lie à eux ?

D'abord le fait que nous adorons la musique d'Offenbach et voulons la servir le mieux possible. J'aime beaucoup Laurent Pelly parce qu'il me fait confiance et trouve toujours des solutions qui me sont adaptées. Et puis il n'hésite pas à aller contre la musique, ce qui crée une tension plus intéressante que si la mise en scène dit exactement la meme chose que la partition. Quant à Marc, il essaie de nettoyer les partitions, afin qu'on les entende comme si c'était la première fois. Il s'intéresse à la couleur des mots, et meme au non-dit, au "sous-texte". Ses tempi sont certes souvent très rapides, et il n'est pas facile à suivre, mais cela aussi crée une tension positive : on doit toujours etre aux aguets, et les finales d'actes sont si excitants !

Je suppose que c'est le succès immense de La Belle Hélène qui vous a encouragée à aborder un nouveau role offenbachien ?

Si je me souviens bien, c'est à la fin de la première série de Belle Hélène, sachant que je ne pourrais assurer la première reprise, que Jean-Pierre Brossmann a évoqué l'idée d'un autre ouvrage. La Grande Duchesse est vraiment très différente : impossible de faire une copie du spectacle précédent. Elle est à la fois plus drole et moins drole. On y ridiculise la guerre et la corruption du pouvoir, ce qui me plaît bien. La fin est plus cruelle et mon personnage n'est pas très sympathique, ce qui me plaît moins : j'ai besoin qu'on m'aime !

Qu'est-ce qui vous attire dans Offenbach ?

C'est d'abord, au stade actuel de ma carrière, de faire quelque chose de tout à fait différent, après toutes ces Maréchales... Attention, j'adore Richard Strauss, d'ailleurs sans lui j'aurais été au chomage Sans parler de ces chefs qui vous noient sous un flot orchestral contre lequel on ne peut pas lutter.

Tous les chefs ?

Oh non Je lui ai dit que j'aimerais bien chanter Les Quatre Derniers Lieder avec lui, mais il m'a répondu qu'ils étaient de toute façon inchantables. Quel homme merveilleux Il a préféré renoncer à une carrière plus prestigieuse car il préfère etre entouré de ceux qu'il aime et qui l'aiment : je suis pareille. Et puis j'adore Bernard Haitink, avec qui j'ai fait mes débuts à Glyndebourne il y a 27 ans. C'est la seule audition que j'aie jamais passée, et elle a marché. Je pense qu'il s'en est vite débarrassé car il détestait les auditions, tout comme moi. J'ai réussi le contre-ut d'Ann Trulove dans le Rake's Progress de Stravinsky et ça a suffi. Pourtant, ce n'était pas "joli joli". Ce n'est jamais joli joli, d'ailleurs.

Vous chantez certains roles, y compris dans Offenbach, dans lesquels on est habitué à entendre des voix plus lourdes. Est-ce un problème?

C'en est un si j'essaie de gonfler ma voix, de forcer le volume dans le médium. Quand j'ai travaillé la Maréchale, je suis allée consulter Georg Solti, qui était si gentil. Il m'a dit quelque chose de très simple : "N'essaie pas de faire comme les autres, chante-le avec ta voix. Tu envies les autres sopranes pour des qualités que tu n'as pas, mais dis-toi que beaucoup de sopranes aimeraient chanter comme tu le fais toi." Cela donne confiance. Tout comme quand j'ai rencontré Denise Duval, la créatrice de La Voix humaine de Poulenc, et qu'elle m'a dit avoir aimé mon interprétation de cette oeuvre. Vous vous rendez compte : Denise Duval!

Recommended Recordings:

Voici le sabre de mon père from La Grande Duchesse de Gérolstein, with Livine Mertens, sop. (1930).

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):