Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



Plumbago_9780993198359_1.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Commentary

Garsington Opera Announces 2020 season and 2019 Paris Performance

Garsington Opera is delighted to announce the 2020 season that will open on 28 May, featuring three new productions - Verdi’s Un giorno di regno, Mozart’s Mitridate, re di Ponto, Dvořák’s Rusalka and a revival of John Cox’s legendary production of Beethoven’s Fidelio.

Un ballo in maschera at Investec Opera Holland Park: in conversation with Alison Langer

“Sop. Page, attendant on the King.” So, reads a typical character description of the loyal page Oscar, whose actions, in Verdi’s Un ballo in maschera, unintentionally lead to his monarch’s death. He reveals the costume that King Gustavo is wearing at the masked ball, thus enabling the monarch’s secretary, Anckarstroem, to shoot him. The dying King falls into the faithful Oscar’s arms.

Martin Duncan directs the first UK staging of Offenbach's Fantasio at Garsington

A mournful Princess forced by her father into an arranged marriage. A Prince who laments that no-one loves him for himself, and so exchanges places with his aide-de-camp. A melancholy dreamer who dons a deceased jester’s motley and finds himself imprisoned for impertinence.

Thomas Larcher's The Hunting Gun at the Aldeburgh Festival: in conversation with Peter Schöne

‘Aloneness’ does not immediately seem a likely or fruitful subject for an opera. But, loneliness and isolation - an individual’s inner sphere, which no other human can truly know or enter - are at the core of Yasushi Inoue’s creative expression.

The London Handel Festival and The Royal Opera announce a co-production of Handel’s Susanna starring members of The Royal Opera’s Jette Parker Young Artists Programme

The London Handel Festival and The Royal Opera today [14 May 2019] announced a co-production of Handel’s oratorio Susanna as part of the 2020 London Handel Festival. The new production, performed in English in the Linbury Theatre [5 - 14 March 2020], will star members and Link Artists from The Royal Opera’s Jette Parker Young Artists Programme. Handel’s Susanna was written for Covent Garden and had its premiere on the site in 1749, but has not been performed at Covent Garden since.

Royal Opera House announces 17 new productions for its 2019/20 Season

The Royal Opera House today launches its 2019/20 Season, unveiling an exciting range of new commissions, world premieres and much-loved revivals, supported by a diverse range of ticketed and free daytime events, activities and festivals for people of all ages. In the first full Season since the completion of the Royal Opera House’s three-year Open Up renovation, The Royal Opera Company unveils a host of innovative new work, with 13 new productions, including two world premieres, in the Season ahead.

In interview with Polly Graham, Artistic Director of Longborough Festival Opera

What links Wagner’s Das Rheingold, Donizetti’s Anna Bolena, Mozart’s Don Giovanni and Cavalli’s La Calisto? It sounds like the sort of question Paul Gambaccini might pose to contestants on BBC Radio 4’s music quiz, Counterpoint.

Carlo Diacono: L’Alpino

“Diacono himself does not know what musical talent he possesses” – Mascagni

Daniel Kramer to step down as English National Opera’s Artistic Director

Daniel Kramer is to step down as ENO’s Artistic Director at the end of July 2019 in order to focus on directing more opera and theatre full time.

Wexford Festival Opera's award-winning Il bravo to be streamed on ARTE.tv

From 7 pm (CEST), this Sunday 21 April, ARTE, the European public service broadcaster, will stream one of last year’s Wexford Festival Opera productions, Saverio Mercadante’s Il bravo, which was recently named ‘Best Opera Production’ at The Irish Times Irish Theatre Awards. Il bravo will be freely available worldwide on ARTE’s digital on-demand culture channel, Arte Concert, as part of ARTE’s 2019 Opera Season, a special online service for lovers of classical music. The opera will subtitled in English, German and French.

Bampton Classical Opera 2019: Stephen Storace - Bride & Gloom (Gli sposi malcontenti)

Newly-wed Casimiro and Eginia hardly seem to be enjoying a state of marital bliss. Why does Eginia sleep on her own, and why is her ex, Artidoro, still hanging around? He now seems to have an eye for the undoubted charms of Casimiro’s sister, Enrichetta - but she’s also attracted the lustful interest of dull and dusty Dr Valente, a man likely to turn nasty if thwarted …

Transylvanian-born mezzo-soprano Eszter Balogh wins the 2019 Handel Singing Competition

Following the final on Saturday 6 April, the Handel Singing Competition announced mezzo-soprano Eszter Balogh as the 2019 winner. Alongside Eszter, the finalists were Patrick Terry (countertenor), David de Winter (tenor) and William Thomas (bass) and the final took place at St George’s, Hanover Square in London in front of a live audience.

English National Opera announces 2019/20 Season

ENO’s 2019/20 season features seven new productions and three revivals, the greatest number of new productions for five years.

Boston Lyric Opera's East Coast Premiere of The Handmaid’s Tale

Anne Bogart directs East Coast premiere of Ruders & Bentley’s take on Margaret Atwood’s novel.

Christina Scheppelmann appointed General Director of Seattle Opera

Scheppelmann heads to the Pacific Northwest following leadership roles in the U.S., Europe, and the Middle East

Handel Singing Competition semi-finalists announced

The Handel Singing Competition has announced its 13 semi-finalists who will be competing in the 2019 Competition. The semi-final is due to take place on 5 March at Grosvenor Chapel, and the final is on 6 April at St George’s, Hanover Square - both in front of a live audience. The Competition this year received over 170 applications from all around the world, from 25 countries as far afield as Argentina, Australia, Israel, the United States and Canada.

Longborough Festival Opera founders to receive Wagner Society award

The Wagner Society has announced that Longborough Festival Opera co-founders Martin and Lizzie Graham will receive its prestigious Reginald Goodall Award, which recognises individuals who have been of outstanding service to Wagner and his music.

Six Charlotte Mew Settings: in conversation with composer Kate Whitley

Though she won praise from the literary greats of her day, including Thomas Hardy, Virginia Woolf, Ezra Pound and Siegfried Sassoon, the Victorian poet Charlotte Mew (1869-1928) was little-known among the contemporary reading public. When she visited the Poetry Bookshop of Harold Monro, the publisher of her first and only collection, The Farmer’s Bride (1916), she was asked, “Are you Charlotte Mew?” Her reply was characteristically diffident and self-deprecatory: “I’m sorry to say I am.”

"It Lives!": Mark Grey 're-animates' Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

“It lives!” So cries Victor Frankenstein in Richard Brinsley Peake’s Presumption: or the Fate of Frankenstein on beholding the animation of his creature for the first time. Peake might equally have been describing the novel upon which he had based his 1823 play which, staged at the English Opera House, had such a successful first run that it gave rise to fourteen further adaptations of Mary Shelley’s 1818 novella in the following three years.

Bampton Classical Opera Young Singers' Competition 2019

Applications will open on March 1, 2019 for Bampton Classical Opera’s fourth biennial Young Singers’ Competition. The competition was launched in 2013 to celebrate the company’s 20th birthday. It is now well established and identifies, rewards and nurtures some of the country’s most talented young professional singers aged 21-32 and their accompanists.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Commentary

01 Oct 2004

Le Monde on Film Makers and Opera

L'opéra au cinéma, entre chic et surprise LE MONDE | 30.09.04 | 14em5 La mise en scène d'opéra est, pour des cinéastes comme Benoît Jacquot, Atom Egoyan, Robert Altman... l'occasion d'expériences exceptionnelles. "Il y a dans l'opéra un truc qui...

L'opéra au cinéma, entre chic et surprise
LE MONDE | 30.09.04 | 14em5

La mise en scène d'opéra est, pour des cinéastes comme Benoît Jacquot, Atom Egoyan, Robert Altman... l'occasion d'expériences exceptionnelles.

"Il y a dans l'opéra un truc qui gratte le cinéaste" : Benoît Jacquot, qui vient de faire ses débuts de metteur en scène d'opéra avec Werther, de Jules Massenet, à Londres, souligne une évidence. Dès les débuts du cinéma, les collisions avec l'opéra n'ont pas manqué, depuis Géraldine Farrar, égérie du Metropolitan de New York engagée par Cecil B. De Mille pour Tentation (1915), ou Alla Nazimova jouant Salomé (1923), jusqu'à Sophia Loren, Aïaut;da au visage noirci chantant avec la voix de Renata Tebaldi (1953). La collaboration la plus célèbre du siècle entre une cantatrice et un metteur en scène n'unit-elle pas, quatre ans durant, Maria Callas et Luchino Visconti ? En cinq productions pour la Scala de Milan, dont la plus fameuse des Traviata (1955), le duo magnifique réinventa le chant et le spectacle.

Serait-ce de cet illustre exemple que revent les directeurs d'opéra qui, ces dernières années, convient de plus en plus les cinéastes pour de nouvelles productions ? On a beaucoup parlé de l'engagement du Danois Lars von Trier pour un Ring à Bayreuth en 2005. Las, l'auteur de Dogville (2003) a annulé. Au Los Angeles Opera, les pourparlers avec George Lucas pour une mise en scène du Ring - là encore - ont échoué. Les élucubrations informatiques du maître de La Guerre des étoiles ont été jugées trop couteuses.

"Le Ring par Star Wars, c'est le supermarché à l'opéra " Gérard Mortier regrette cependant les Contes d'Hoffmann qu'il envisagea un temps avec David Lynch, pour Salzbourg, ou le Pelléas avec André Delveau, qu'il a abandonné trop vite.

Si les projets avortés sont légion, c'est aussi parce que "les rythmes de l'opéra et du cinéma sont difficilement compatibles", précise Atom Egoyan. Depuis 1996, le cinéaste canadien d'origine arménienne travaille régulièrement à l'opéra. "A la sortie d'Exotica, en 1994, le directeur de la Canadian Opera Company m'avait contacté. Le film parle de voyeurisme, de désir frustré, de fétichisme, ce qui faisait de moi, à son avis, un choix naturel pour Salomé."

"UNE FUSION ABSOLUE"

Egoyan livra une Salomé spectaculaire, qui remporta un grand succès public et fut "une expérience extraordinaire". Son travail pour la scène et le cinéma paraît dès lors indissociable : "Dans tous mes films, j'ai travaillé sur la musique, utilisé des motifs pour représenter des personnages ou des idées. L'opéra permet une fusion absolue de tous les arts. J'y trouve, par exemple, l'occasion de me confronter aux questions d'art contemporain qui m'agitent. Sur scène comme dans des installations, on peut explorer le lien entre l'espace scénique et l'image."

Ou entre l'image et l'espace : ainsi le film de Robert Altman Un mariage (1978) renaîtra sur la scène du Chicago Lyric Opera, réinventé par le compositeur William Bolcom. S'il a déjà mis en scène deux opéras, le cinéaste américain s'avoue "agréablement surpris" par cette expérience originale : après avoir écrit le livret avec Arnold Weinstein, il va le mettre lui-meme en scène. "J'ai le film bien en mémoire, mais, franchement, j'ai une préférence pour le livret, confie-t-il à l'approche des répétitions, programmées début novembre. Il y avait quarante-huit personnages dans le film, nous en avons condensé un certain nombre et je trouve le résultat plus intense."

Vittorio Gassman ou Lilian Gish dans le film, Jerry Hadley et Catherine Malfitano sur la scène de Chicago. "Ce sont tous des acteurs, après tout", grommelle Robert Altman. La fameuse question de la direction des chanteurs n'agite pas davantage Atom Egoyan, qui se borne à préciser que "les limites physiques du chanteur doivent etre respectées".

Pour Marthe Keller, ce qui doit etre respecté avant tout, c'est la musique. L'actrice vient de passer haut la main l'examen du Metropolitan de New York avec un Don Giovanni présenté ce printemps et prépare pour septembre 2005 un Sophie's Choice, du compositeur anglais Nicholas Maw, à la Deutsche Oper de Berlin. "L'expérience de la scène et, d'une certaine façon, de la musique m'a appris la simplicité. Ce qui n'est pas le plus facile ! Mais je pense que le péril du cinéaste est paradoxalement son oeil, beaucoup plus développé que son oreille, qui l'incite à privilégier les effets au détriment de l'émotion."

A l'instar du théâtre à partir des années 1960, le cinéma aura-t-il à son tour pour mission de sauver l'opéra de la déshérence scénique et dramaturgique ? Le théâtre, en apportant une théorisation, avait renforcé le role du metteur en scène interprète capable de transcender l'œuvre par sa lecture. Le cinéma, qui utilise les instruments d'une société en prise directe avec l'image et l'information, saura-t-il éviter les miroirs aux alouettes ? Le mythe Callas-Visconti a sans doute encore de beaux jours devant lui.

Florence Colombani et Marie-Aude Roux

Catherine Malfitano

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):