Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780393088953.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Commentary

The Moderate Soprano : Q&A with Nancy Carroll and Roger Allam

Nancy Carroll and Roger Allam play Audrey Mildmay and John Christie in David Hare’s play The Moderate Soprano which is currently at the Duke of York’s Theatre in London.

Soprano Nadine Sierra Wins the 2018 Beverly Sills Artist Award

Soprano Nadine Sierra has been named the winner of the 13 th annual Beverly Sills Artist Award for young singers at the Metropolitan Opera.

The Grand Tour: A European Journey in Song

The seventeenth Oxford Lieder Festival (12-27 October 2018) will celebrate a rich tapestry of music, words and performance in European song and will showcase the pinnacles of the repertoire while exploring wider cultural influences.

An Interview with Soprano Lisette Oropesa

Lisette Oropesa sings Eurydice in Los Angeles Opera’s French version of Gluck’s Orpheus and Eurydice that can currently be seen at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.

Opera in Amsterdam in 2018-2019

The operatic tradition is not as old in the Netherlands as in other European countries, yet opera is a vital part of the Dutch classical landscape. Both Dutch National Opera & Ballet and the Concertgebouw are in Amsterdam, so the capital gets the lion’s share of the opera on offer.

Lyric Opera of Chicago to Premiere Fellow Travelers—A Preview

On 17 March 2018 Lyric Opera of Chicago will premiere the 2016 opera Fellow Travelers by Gregory Spears (with a libretto by Greg Pierce, based on the novel by Thomas Mallon. Mallon’s 2007 novel offered fresh perspectives on the paranoiac investigations of McCarthy-era Washington, DC, through the lens of a gay relationship.

A newly discovered song by Alma Mahler

It is well known that in addition to the fourteen songs by Alma Mahler published in her lifetime, several dozen more - perhaps as many as one hundred - were written and have been lost or destroyed.

Glyndebourne Opera Cup 2018: semi-finalists announced

The semi-finalists for the first Glyndebourne Opera Cup have been announced. Following a worldwide search that attracted nearly 200 entries, and preliminary rounds in Berlin, London and Philadelphia, 23 singers aged 21-28 have been chosen to compete in the semi-final at Glyndebourne on 22 March.

ENO announces Studio Live casts and three new Harewood Artists

English National Opera (ENO) has announced the casts for Acis and Galatea and Paul Bunyan, 2018’s two ENO Studio Live productions. ENO Studio Live forms part of ENO Outside which takes ENO’s work to arts-engaged audiences that may not have considered opera before, presenting the immense power of opera in more intimate studio and theatre environments.

Handel in London: 2018 London Handel Festival

The 2018 London Handel Festival explores Handel’s relationship with the city. Running from 17 March to 16 April 2018, the Festival offers four weeks of concerts, talks, walks & film screenings explore masterpieces by Handel, from semi-staged operas to grand oratorio and lunchtime recitals.

Dartington International Summer School & Festival: 70th anniversary programme

Internationally-renowned Dartington Summer School & Festival has released the course programme for its 70th Anniversary Summer School and Festival, curated by the pianist Joanna MacGregor, that will run from 28th July to 25th of August 2018.

The Schumanns at home: Temple Song 2018

Following their marriage, on 12th September 1840, Robert and Clara Schumann made their home in a first-floor apartment on the piano nobile of a classical-style residence now known as the Schumann House, on Inselstraße, just a short walk from the centre of Leipzig.

Written on Skin: the Melos Sinfonia take George Benjamin's opera to St Petersburg

As I approach St Cyprian’s Church in Marylebone, musical sounds which are at once strange and sensuous surf the air. Inside I find seventy or so instrumentalists and singers nestled somewhat crowdedly between the pillars of the nave, rehearsing George Benjamin’s much praised 2012 opera, Written on Skin.

Bampton Classical Opera Young Singers’ Competition 2017

Bampton Classical Opera’s third Young Singers’ Competition takes place this autumn, culminating in a public final at Holywell Music Room, Oxford on November 19. This biennial competition was first launched in 2013 to celebrate the company’s 20th birthday, and is aimed at identifying the finest emerging young opera singers currently working in the UK.

Peter Kellner announced as winner of 2018 Wigmore Hall/Independent Opera Voice Fellowship

Independent Opera (IO) was very present at the Wigmore Hall last week. On Thursday 5 October, IO announced 26 year old Slovakian bass Peter Kellner as the winner of the 2018 Wigmore Hall/IO Voice Fellowship, a two-year award of £10,000 plus professional mentoring from IO and the Wigmore Hall. A graduate of the Konzervatórium Košice Timonova and the Mozarteum University Salzburg, Peter is currently a member of Oper Graz in Austria where later this season he will sing the title role of Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro and Colline in Puccini’s La bohème.

‘Never was such advertisement for a film!’: Thomas Kemp and the OAE present a film of Strauss's Der Rosenkavalier at the Oxford Lieder Festival

Richard Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier was premiered at the Dresden Semperoper on 26th January 1911. Almost fifteen years to the day, on 10th January 1926, the theatre hosted another Rosenkavalier ‘premiere’, with the screening of a silent film version of the opera, directed by Robert Wiene - best known for his expressionistic masterpiece The Cabinet of Dr Caligari. The two-act scenario had been devised by Hugo von Hofmannsthal and the screening was accompanied by a symphony orchestra which Strauss himself conducted.

Mark Padmore on festivals, lieder and musical conversations

I have to confess, somewhat sheepishly, at the start of my conversation with Mark Padmore, that I had not previously been aware of the annual music festival held in the small Cotswolds town of Tetbury, which was founded in 2002 and to which Padmore will return later this month to perform a recital of lieder by Schubert and Schumann with pianist Till Fellner.

Natalya Romaniw: 'one of the outstanding sopranos of her generation’

There can hardly be a dry eye in the house, at the ‘Theatre in the Woods’ at West Horsley Place - Grange Park Opera’s new home - when, in Act 3 of Janáček's first mature opera, Natalya Romaniw’s Jenůfa realises that the tiny child whose frozen body has been discovered under the ice is her own dead son.

Elizabeth Llewellyn: Investec Opera Holland Park stages Puccini's La Rondine

It’s six or so years ago since soprano Elizabeth Llewellyn appeared as an exciting and highly acclaimed new voice on the UK operatic stage, with critics praising her ‘ravishing account’ (The Stage) of Mozart’s Countess in Investec Opera Holland Park’s 2011 Le nozze di Figaro in which ‘Porgi, amor’ was a ‘highlight of the evening’.

Dougie Boyd, Artistic Director of Garsington Opera: in conversation

One year ago, tens of millions of Britons voted for isolation rather than for cooperation, but Douglas (Dougie) Boyd, Artistic Director of Garsington Opera, is an energetic one-man counterforce with a dynamic conviction that art and culture are strengthened by participation and collaboration; values which, alongside excellence and a spirit of adventure, have seen Garsington Opera acquire increasing renown and esteem on the international stage during his tenure, since 2012.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Commentary

01 Oct 2004

Le Monde on Film Makers and Opera

L'opéra au cinéma, entre chic et surprise LE MONDE | 30.09.04 | 14em5 La mise en scène d'opéra est, pour des cinéastes comme Benoît Jacquot, Atom Egoyan, Robert Altman... l'occasion d'expériences exceptionnelles. "Il y a dans l'opéra un truc qui...

L'opéra au cinéma, entre chic et surprise
LE MONDE | 30.09.04 | 14em5

La mise en scène d'opéra est, pour des cinéastes comme Benoît Jacquot, Atom Egoyan, Robert Altman... l'occasion d'expériences exceptionnelles.

"Il y a dans l'opéra un truc qui gratte le cinéaste" : Benoît Jacquot, qui vient de faire ses débuts de metteur en scène d'opéra avec Werther, de Jules Massenet, à Londres, souligne une évidence. Dès les débuts du cinéma, les collisions avec l'opéra n'ont pas manqué, depuis Géraldine Farrar, égérie du Metropolitan de New York engagée par Cecil B. De Mille pour Tentation (1915), ou Alla Nazimova jouant Salomé (1923), jusqu'à Sophia Loren, Aïaut;da au visage noirci chantant avec la voix de Renata Tebaldi (1953). La collaboration la plus célèbre du siècle entre une cantatrice et un metteur en scène n'unit-elle pas, quatre ans durant, Maria Callas et Luchino Visconti ? En cinq productions pour la Scala de Milan, dont la plus fameuse des Traviata (1955), le duo magnifique réinventa le chant et le spectacle.

Serait-ce de cet illustre exemple que revent les directeurs d'opéra qui, ces dernières années, convient de plus en plus les cinéastes pour de nouvelles productions ? On a beaucoup parlé de l'engagement du Danois Lars von Trier pour un Ring à Bayreuth en 2005. Las, l'auteur de Dogville (2003) a annulé. Au Los Angeles Opera, les pourparlers avec George Lucas pour une mise en scène du Ring - là encore - ont échoué. Les élucubrations informatiques du maître de La Guerre des étoiles ont été jugées trop couteuses.

"Le Ring par Star Wars, c'est le supermarché à l'opéra " Gérard Mortier regrette cependant les Contes d'Hoffmann qu'il envisagea un temps avec David Lynch, pour Salzbourg, ou le Pelléas avec André Delveau, qu'il a abandonné trop vite.

Si les projets avortés sont légion, c'est aussi parce que "les rythmes de l'opéra et du cinéma sont difficilement compatibles", précise Atom Egoyan. Depuis 1996, le cinéaste canadien d'origine arménienne travaille régulièrement à l'opéra. "A la sortie d'Exotica, en 1994, le directeur de la Canadian Opera Company m'avait contacté. Le film parle de voyeurisme, de désir frustré, de fétichisme, ce qui faisait de moi, à son avis, un choix naturel pour Salomé."

"UNE FUSION ABSOLUE"

Egoyan livra une Salomé spectaculaire, qui remporta un grand succès public et fut "une expérience extraordinaire". Son travail pour la scène et le cinéma paraît dès lors indissociable : "Dans tous mes films, j'ai travaillé sur la musique, utilisé des motifs pour représenter des personnages ou des idées. L'opéra permet une fusion absolue de tous les arts. J'y trouve, par exemple, l'occasion de me confronter aux questions d'art contemporain qui m'agitent. Sur scène comme dans des installations, on peut explorer le lien entre l'espace scénique et l'image."

Ou entre l'image et l'espace : ainsi le film de Robert Altman Un mariage (1978) renaîtra sur la scène du Chicago Lyric Opera, réinventé par le compositeur William Bolcom. S'il a déjà mis en scène deux opéras, le cinéaste américain s'avoue "agréablement surpris" par cette expérience originale : après avoir écrit le livret avec Arnold Weinstein, il va le mettre lui-meme en scène. "J'ai le film bien en mémoire, mais, franchement, j'ai une préférence pour le livret, confie-t-il à l'approche des répétitions, programmées début novembre. Il y avait quarante-huit personnages dans le film, nous en avons condensé un certain nombre et je trouve le résultat plus intense."

Vittorio Gassman ou Lilian Gish dans le film, Jerry Hadley et Catherine Malfitano sur la scène de Chicago. "Ce sont tous des acteurs, après tout", grommelle Robert Altman. La fameuse question de la direction des chanteurs n'agite pas davantage Atom Egoyan, qui se borne à préciser que "les limites physiques du chanteur doivent etre respectées".

Pour Marthe Keller, ce qui doit etre respecté avant tout, c'est la musique. L'actrice vient de passer haut la main l'examen du Metropolitan de New York avec un Don Giovanni présenté ce printemps et prépare pour septembre 2005 un Sophie's Choice, du compositeur anglais Nicholas Maw, à la Deutsche Oper de Berlin. "L'expérience de la scène et, d'une certaine façon, de la musique m'a appris la simplicité. Ce qui n'est pas le plus facile ! Mais je pense que le péril du cinéaste est paradoxalement son oeil, beaucoup plus développé que son oreille, qui l'incite à privilégier les effets au détriment de l'émotion."

A l'instar du théâtre à partir des années 1960, le cinéma aura-t-il à son tour pour mission de sauver l'opéra de la déshérence scénique et dramaturgique ? Le théâtre, en apportant une théorisation, avait renforcé le role du metteur en scène interprète capable de transcender l'œuvre par sa lecture. Le cinéma, qui utilise les instruments d'une société en prise directe avec l'image et l'information, saura-t-il éviter les miroirs aux alouettes ? Le mythe Callas-Visconti a sans doute encore de beaux jours devant lui.

Florence Colombani et Marie-Aude Roux

Catherine Malfitano

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):