Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780393088953.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Commentary

Written on Skin: the Melos Sinfonia take George Benjamin's opera to St Petersburg

As I approach St Cyprian’s Church in Marylebone, musical sounds which are at once strange and sensuous surf the air. Inside I find seventy or so instrumentalists and singers nestled somewhat crowdedly between the pillars of the nave, rehearsing George Benjamin’s much praised 2012 opera, Written on Skin.

Bampton Classical Opera Young Singers’ Competition 2017

Bampton Classical Opera’s third Young Singers’ Competition takes place this autumn, culminating in a public final at Holywell Music Room, Oxford on November 19. This biennial competition was first launched in 2013 to celebrate the company’s 20th birthday, and is aimed at identifying the finest emerging young opera singers currently working in the UK.

Peter Kellner announced as winner of 2018 Wigmore Hall/Independent Opera Voice Fellowship

Independent Opera (IO) was very present at the Wigmore Hall last week. On Thursday 5 October, IO announced 26 year old Slovakian bass Peter Kellner as the winner of the 2018 Wigmore Hall/IO Voice Fellowship, a two-year award of £10,000 plus professional mentoring from IO and the Wigmore Hall. A graduate of the Konzervatórium Košice Timonova and the Mozarteum University Salzburg, Peter is currently a member of Oper Graz in Austria where later this season he will sing the title role of Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro and Colline in Puccini’s La bohème.

‘Never was such advertisement for a film!’: Thomas Kemp and the OAE present a film of Strauss's Der Rosenkavalier at the Oxford Lieder Festival

Richard Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier was premiered at the Dresden Semperoper on 26th January 1911. Almost fifteen years to the day, on 10th January 1926, the theatre hosted another Rosenkavalier ‘premiere’, with the screening of a silent film version of the opera, directed by Robert Wiene - best known for his expressionistic masterpiece The Cabinet of Dr Caligari. The two-act scenario had been devised by Hugo von Hoffmansthal and the screening was accompanied by a symphony orchestra which Strauss himself conducted.

Mark Padmore on festivals, lieder and musical conversations

I have to confess, somewhat sheepishly, at the start of my conversation with Mark Padmore, that I had not previously been aware of the annual music festival held in the small Cotswolds town of Tetbury, which was founded in 2002 and to which Padmore will return later this month to perform a recital of lieder by Schubert and Schumann with pianist Till Fellner.

Natalya Romaniw: 'one of the outstanding sopranos of her generation’

There can hardly be a dry eye in the house, at the ‘Theatre in the Woods’ at West Horsley Place - Grange Park Opera’s new home - when, in Act 3 of Janáček's first mature opera, Natalya Romaniw’s Jenůfa realises that the tiny child whose frozen body has been discovered under the ice is her own dead son.

Elizabeth Llewellyn: Investec Opera Holland Park stages Puccini's La Rondine

It’s six or so years ago since soprano Elizabeth Llewellyn appeared as an exciting and highly acclaimed new voice on the UK operatic stage, with critics praising her ‘ravishing account’ (The Stage) of Mozart’s Countess in Investec Opera Holland Park’s 2011 Le nozze di Figaro in which ‘Porgi, amor’ was a ‘highlight of the evening’.

Dougie Boyd, Artistic Director of Garsington Opera: in conversation

One year ago, tens of millions of Britons voted for isolation rather than for cooperation, but Douglas (Dougie) Boyd, Artistic Director of Garsington Opera, is an energetic one-man counterforce with a dynamic conviction that art and culture are strengthened by participation and collaboration; values which, alongside excellence and a spirit of adventure, have seen Garsington Opera acquire increasing renown and esteem on the international stage during his tenure, since 2012.

A Chat With Italian Conductor Riccardo Frizza

Riccardo Frizza is a young Italian conductor whose performances in Europe and the United States are getting rave reviews. He tells us of his love for the operas of Verdi, Bellini, and particularly Donizetti.

LA Opera’s Young Artist Program Celebrates Tenth Anniversary

On Saturday evening April 1, 2017, Placido Domingo and Los Angeles Opera celebrated their tenth year of training young opera artists in the Domingo-Colburn-Stein Program. From the singing I heard, they definitely have something of which to be proud.

When Performance Gets Political: A Brooklyn Concert Benefiting the ACLU

What’s an artist’s place in politics? That’s the question many were asking after actress Meryl Streep made a pointed speech criticizing President Trump at the Golden Globes. Trump responded directly to Streep, using his preferred communication medium of Twitter to call Streep “overrated.”

Bampton Classical Opera 2017

In 2015, Bampton Classical Opera’s production of Salieri’s La grotta di Trofonio - a UK premiere - received well-deserved accolades: ‘a revelation ... the music is magnificent’ (Seen and Heard International), ‘giddily exciting, propelled by wit, charm and bags of joy’ (The Spectator), ‘lively, inventive ... a joy from start to finish’ (The Oxford Times), ‘They have done Salieri proud’ (The Arts Desk) and ‘an enthusiastic performance of riotously spirited music’ (Opera Britannia) were just some of the superlative compliments festooned by the critical press.

The nature of narropera?

How many singers does it take to make an opera? There are single-role operas - Schönberg’s Erwartung (1924) and Eight Songs for a Mad King by Peter Maxwell Davies (1969) spring immediately to mind - and there are operas that just require a pair of performers, such as Rimsky-Korsakov’s Mozart i Salieri (1897) or The Telephone by Menotti (1947).

Battles administration neglects FLO’s assets by defunding the program

The college administration and President Denise Battles’ recent decision to defund the Finger Lakes Opera came as a shock to many and a concern to more. This decision reflects the administration’s blatant disregard for the arts and reveals a mindset that is counterproductive to the mission of the college.

2017 Summer Festival at Lucerne

Lucerne Festival announces its 2017 Summer Festival.

BEMF Chamber Opera Series Presents Splendors of Versailles

The GRAMMY Award-winning BEMF Chamber Opera Series returns with an all-new production inspired by the splendor and music of the palace of Versailles. King Louis XIV transformed his father’s pastoral hunting lodge at Versailles into a lavish palace that served as the seat of government and culture in France.

Center for Contemporary Opera presents Jane Eyre (World Premiere)

Louis Karchin’s Jane Eyre, a full-length opera in three acts with a libretto by Diane Osen based on Charlotte Bronte’s novel, will receive its world premiere at The Kaye Playhouse (Hunter College) on Thursday, October 20, 7:30pm with a second performance on Saturday, October 22, 8pm. Jane Eyre is Karchin’s second opera, composed in 2014, following his critically acclaimed one-act comic opera Romulus.

Boston Early Music Festival announces the appointment of Melinda Sullivan to the new position of the Lucy Graham Dance Director

Cambridge, MA–The Boston Early Music Festival (BEMF) is pleased to announce the appointment of Melinda Sullivan to the new position of the Lucy Graham Dance Director.

2016 Elizabeth Connell Prize Winner Announced

Kseniia Muslanova from the Russian Federation has won the 3rd annual Elizabeth Connell Prize for aspiring dramatic sopranos held at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music in Sydney Australia on 3 September 2016.

A New Opera Company with a True Story of Forbidden Love

Victory Hall Opera is a new company making its debut in Charlottesville Virginia on August 14, 2016. Its first presentation will be Richard Strauss’s and Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s Der Rosenkavalier.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Commentary

01 Oct 2004

Le Monde on Film Makers and Opera

L'opéra au cinéma, entre chic et surprise LE MONDE | 30.09.04 | 14em5 La mise en scène d'opéra est, pour des cinéastes comme Benoît Jacquot, Atom Egoyan, Robert Altman... l'occasion d'expériences exceptionnelles. "Il y a dans l'opéra un truc qui...

L'opéra au cinéma, entre chic et surprise
LE MONDE | 30.09.04 | 14em5

La mise en scène d'opéra est, pour des cinéastes comme Benoît Jacquot, Atom Egoyan, Robert Altman... l'occasion d'expériences exceptionnelles.

"Il y a dans l'opéra un truc qui gratte le cinéaste" : Benoît Jacquot, qui vient de faire ses débuts de metteur en scène d'opéra avec Werther, de Jules Massenet, à Londres, souligne une évidence. Dès les débuts du cinéma, les collisions avec l'opéra n'ont pas manqué, depuis Géraldine Farrar, égérie du Metropolitan de New York engagée par Cecil B. De Mille pour Tentation (1915), ou Alla Nazimova jouant Salomé (1923), jusqu'à Sophia Loren, Aïaut;da au visage noirci chantant avec la voix de Renata Tebaldi (1953). La collaboration la plus célèbre du siècle entre une cantatrice et un metteur en scène n'unit-elle pas, quatre ans durant, Maria Callas et Luchino Visconti ? En cinq productions pour la Scala de Milan, dont la plus fameuse des Traviata (1955), le duo magnifique réinventa le chant et le spectacle.

Serait-ce de cet illustre exemple que revent les directeurs d'opéra qui, ces dernières années, convient de plus en plus les cinéastes pour de nouvelles productions ? On a beaucoup parlé de l'engagement du Danois Lars von Trier pour un Ring à Bayreuth en 2005. Las, l'auteur de Dogville (2003) a annulé. Au Los Angeles Opera, les pourparlers avec George Lucas pour une mise en scène du Ring - là encore - ont échoué. Les élucubrations informatiques du maître de La Guerre des étoiles ont été jugées trop couteuses.

"Le Ring par Star Wars, c'est le supermarché à l'opéra " Gérard Mortier regrette cependant les Contes d'Hoffmann qu'il envisagea un temps avec David Lynch, pour Salzbourg, ou le Pelléas avec André Delveau, qu'il a abandonné trop vite.

Si les projets avortés sont légion, c'est aussi parce que "les rythmes de l'opéra et du cinéma sont difficilement compatibles", précise Atom Egoyan. Depuis 1996, le cinéaste canadien d'origine arménienne travaille régulièrement à l'opéra. "A la sortie d'Exotica, en 1994, le directeur de la Canadian Opera Company m'avait contacté. Le film parle de voyeurisme, de désir frustré, de fétichisme, ce qui faisait de moi, à son avis, un choix naturel pour Salomé."

"UNE FUSION ABSOLUE"

Egoyan livra une Salomé spectaculaire, qui remporta un grand succès public et fut "une expérience extraordinaire". Son travail pour la scène et le cinéma paraît dès lors indissociable : "Dans tous mes films, j'ai travaillé sur la musique, utilisé des motifs pour représenter des personnages ou des idées. L'opéra permet une fusion absolue de tous les arts. J'y trouve, par exemple, l'occasion de me confronter aux questions d'art contemporain qui m'agitent. Sur scène comme dans des installations, on peut explorer le lien entre l'espace scénique et l'image."

Ou entre l'image et l'espace : ainsi le film de Robert Altman Un mariage (1978) renaîtra sur la scène du Chicago Lyric Opera, réinventé par le compositeur William Bolcom. S'il a déjà mis en scène deux opéras, le cinéaste américain s'avoue "agréablement surpris" par cette expérience originale : après avoir écrit le livret avec Arnold Weinstein, il va le mettre lui-meme en scène. "J'ai le film bien en mémoire, mais, franchement, j'ai une préférence pour le livret, confie-t-il à l'approche des répétitions, programmées début novembre. Il y avait quarante-huit personnages dans le film, nous en avons condensé un certain nombre et je trouve le résultat plus intense."

Vittorio Gassman ou Lilian Gish dans le film, Jerry Hadley et Catherine Malfitano sur la scène de Chicago. "Ce sont tous des acteurs, après tout", grommelle Robert Altman. La fameuse question de la direction des chanteurs n'agite pas davantage Atom Egoyan, qui se borne à préciser que "les limites physiques du chanteur doivent etre respectées".

Pour Marthe Keller, ce qui doit etre respecté avant tout, c'est la musique. L'actrice vient de passer haut la main l'examen du Metropolitan de New York avec un Don Giovanni présenté ce printemps et prépare pour septembre 2005 un Sophie's Choice, du compositeur anglais Nicholas Maw, à la Deutsche Oper de Berlin. "L'expérience de la scène et, d'une certaine façon, de la musique m'a appris la simplicité. Ce qui n'est pas le plus facile ! Mais je pense que le péril du cinéaste est paradoxalement son oeil, beaucoup plus développé que son oreille, qui l'incite à privilégier les effets au détriment de l'émotion."

A l'instar du théâtre à partir des années 1960, le cinéma aura-t-il à son tour pour mission de sauver l'opéra de la déshérence scénique et dramaturgique ? Le théâtre, en apportant une théorisation, avait renforcé le role du metteur en scène interprète capable de transcender l'œuvre par sa lecture. Le cinéma, qui utilise les instruments d'une société en prise directe avec l'image et l'information, saura-t-il éviter les miroirs aux alouettes ? Le mythe Callas-Visconti a sans doute encore de beaux jours devant lui.

Florence Colombani et Marie-Aude Roux

Catherine Malfitano

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):