Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



Plumbago_9780993198359_1.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Performances

The 2019 Jette Parker Young Artists Summer Performance

This year’s Jette Parker Young Artists Summer Performance offered a veritable operatic smörgåsbord, presenting sizable excerpts from operas ranging from Gluck to Saint-Saëns, from Mozart to Debussy, by way of some Italian masterpieces, courtesy of Rossini and Verdi.

Cilea's L'arlesiana at Opera Holland Park

In a rank order of suicidal depressives, Federico - the Provençal peasant besotted with ‘the woman from Arles’, L’arlesiana, who yearns to break free from his mother’s claustrophobic grasp, who seeks solace from betrayal and disillusionment in the arms of a patient childhood sweetheart, but who is ultimately broken by deluded dreams and unrequited passion - would surely give many a Thomas Hardy protagonist a run for their money.

Prom 1: Karina Canellakis makes history on the opening night of the Proms 2019

The young American conductor Karina Canellakis made history as the first woman to conduct the First Night of the Proms last night (19 July 2019) as she conducted the BBC Singers, BBC Symphony Chorus and BBC Symphony Orchestra at the Royal Albert Hall with soloists Asmik Grigorian (soprano), Jennifer Johnston (mezzo-soprano), Ladislav Elgr (tenor), Jan Martiník (bass) and Peter Holder (organ) in Zosha Di Castri's Long is the Journey, Short Is the Memory (the world premiere of a BBC commission), Antonin Dvořák’s The Golden Spinning Wheel and Leoš Janáček’s Glagolitic Mass.

Barbe & Doucet's new production of Die Zauberflöte at Glyndebourne

No one would pretend that Emanuel Schikaneder’s libretto for Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte would go down well with the #MeToo generation. Or with first, second or third wave feminists for that matter.

Three Chamber Operas at the Aix Festival

Along with the celestial Mozart Requiem, a doomed Tosca and a gloriously witty Mahagonny the Aix Festival’s new artistic director Pierre Audi regaled us with three chamber operas — the premiere of a brilliant Les Mille Endormis, the technically playful Blank Out (on a turgid subject), and a heavy-duty Jakob Lenz.

Laurent Pelly's production of La Fille du régiment returns to Covent Garden

French soprano Sabine Devieilhe seems to find feisty adolescence a neat fit. I first encountered her when she assumed the role of a pill-popping nightclubbing ‘Beauty’ - raced from ecstasy-induced wonder to emergency ward - when I reviewed the DVD of Krzysztof Warlikowski’s production of Handel’s Il trionfo del Tempo e del Disinganno at Aix-en-Provence in 2016.

The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny in Aix

Make no mistake, this is about you! Jim laid-out dead on the stage floor, conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen brought his very loud orchestra (London’s Philharmonia) to an abrupt halt. Black out. The maestro then turned his spotlighted face to confront us and he held his stare. There was no mistake, the music was about us.

Mozart's Travels: Classical Opera and The Mozartists at Wigmore Hall

There was a full house at Wigmore Hall for Classical Opera’s/The Mozartists’ final concert of the 2018-19 season: a musical paysage which chartered, largely chronologically, Mozart’s youthful travels from London to The Hague, on to Paris, then Rome, concluding - following stop-overs in European cultural cities such as Munich and Vienna - with an arrival at his final destination, Prague.

Tosca in Aix

From the sublime — the Mozart Requiem — to the ridiculous, namely stage director Christophe Honoré's Tosca. A ridiculous waste of operatic resources.

A terrific, and terrifying, The Turn of the Screw at Garsington

One might describe Christopher Oram’s set for Louisa Muller’s new production of The Turn of the Screw at Garsington as ‘shabby chic’ … if it wasn’t so sinister.

Mozart Requiem in Aix

Pierre Audi, now the directeur général of the Festival d’Aix as well as the artistic director of New York City’s Park Avenue Armory opens a new era for this distinguished opera festival in the south of France with a new work by the Festival’s signature composer, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

A Rachmaninov Drama at Middle Temple Hall

It is Rachmaninov’s major works for orchestra - the Second and Third Piano Concertos, the Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, the Symphonic Dances - alongside the All-Night Vespers and the music for solo piano, which have earned the composer a permanent place in the concert repertoire today.

Fun, Frothy, and Frivolous: L’elisir d’amore at Las Vegas

There are a dizzying array of choices for music entertainment in Las Vegas ranging from Celine Dion and Cher to Paul McCartney and Aerosmith. Admittedly, these performers are a far cry from opera, but the point is that Las Vegas residents have many options when it comes to live music.

McVicar's production of Mozart's Le nozze di Figaro returns to the Royal Opera House

David McVicar's production of Mozart's Le nozze di Figaro at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, has been a remarkable success since it debuted in 2006. Set with the Count of Almaviva's fearfully grand household in 1830, McVicar's trick is to surround the principals by servants in a supra-naturalistic production which emphasises how privacy is at a premium.

The Cunning Little Vixen at the Barbican Hall

The presence of a large cast of ‘animals’ in Janáček’s The Cunning Little Vixen can encourage directors and designers to create costume-confections ranging from Disney-esque schmaltz to grim naturalism.

Barbe-Bleue in Lyon

Stage director Laurent Pelly is famed for his Offenbach stagings, above all others his masterful rendering of Les Contes d’Hoffmann as a nightmare. Mr. Pelly has staged eleven of Offenbach’s ninety-nine operettas over the years (coincidently this production of Barbe-Bleue is Mr. Pelly’s ninety-eighth opera staging).

The Princeton Festival Presents Nixon in China

The Princeton Festival has adopted a successful and sophisticated operatic programming strategy, whereby the annual opera alternates between a standard warhorse and a less known, more challenging work. Last year Princeton presented Puccini’s Madama Butterfly. This year the choice is Nixon in China by modern American composer John Adams, which opened before a nearly full house of appreciative listeners.

Humperdinck's Hansel and Gretel at Grange Park Opera

When Engelbert Humperdinck's sister, Adelheid Wette, wrote the libretto to Hansel and Gretel the idea of a poor family living in a hut near the woods, on the bread-line, would have had an element of realism to it despite the sentimental layers which Wette adds to the tale.

Handel’s Belshazzar at The Grange Festival

What a treat to see members of The Sixteen letting their hair down. This was no strait-laced post-concert knees-up, but a full on, drunken orgy at the court of the most hedonistic ruler in the Old Testament.

Don Giovanni in Paris

A brutalist Don Giovanni at the Palais Garnier, Belgian set designer Jan Versweyveld installed three huge, a vista raw cement towers that overwhelmed the Opéra Garnier’s Second Empire opulence. The eight principals faced off in a battle royale instigated by stage director Ivo van Hove. Conductor Philippe Jordan thrust the Mozart score into the depths of expressionistic conflict.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Performances

15 Nov 2004

Le Figaro Reviews La Traviata at La Fenice: Praises Ciofi, But Not Much Else

Verdi à Las Vegas Venise : de notre envoyé spécial Jacques Doucelin [15 novembre 2004] Un de ces chats comme Venise en a le secret, trone impérial et méprisant au beau milieu d'une place ensoleillée, manteau mité, mais noeud papillon...

Verdi à Las Vegas

Venise : de notre envoyé spécial Jacques Doucelin
[15 novembre 2004]

Un de ces chats comme Venise en a le secret, trone impérial et méprisant au beau milieu d'une place ensoleillée, manteau mité, mais noeud papillon bien dessiné. Soudain, il jaillit à la verticale, moustache en bataille comme si un ressort l'avait projeté : filtrant par un regard, l'eau de la lagune vient d'atteindre son royal séant " Ce qui donne en gaulois : "Venez vite, Anna, l'eau arrive !"

L'aqua alta, la grande affaire des Vénitiens : ils jouent meme à se faire peur. En un tournemain, les planches sont mises en place pour que les touristes - Français à 90% en ce week-end de 11 novembre mâtiné de RTT - puissent circuler à pied sec. Fausse alerte ! L'eau vert amande lèche amoureusement le seuil blanc de l'église San Moïaut;se sans y pénétrer. Puis repart silencieuse comme elle est arrivée. Ainsi va la vie dans le plus beau théâtre du monde qu'est la Sérénissime.

Du théâtre, et du vrai, il y en eut la veille à La Fenice qui renaissait à l'opéra après l'incendie de 1996. Rendue à sa splendeur d'antan, la célèbre salle que l'on voit dans Senso de Visconti, fut inaugurée par un concert de Muti l'an passé (voir nos éditions du 16 décembre 2003), mais attendait toujours sa résurrection lyrique. C'est désormais chose faite avec La Traviata de Verdi, opéra emblématique de son glorieux passé. L'idée de son directeur artistique Sergio Segalini de revenir à la version de la création à Venise en 1853 constitue un attrait non négligeable de ce nouveau spectacle signé par le metteur en scène canadien Robert Carsen.

Si les différences avec l'édition remaniée dès 1854, après l'échec de l'année précédente et après un changement de distribution, ne sautent pas aux oreilles du public, elles sont d'importance pour le role-titre. On a dit souvent qu'il fallait deux voix pour chanter Violetta : dans la version d'origine, celle-ci gagne en homogénéité, l'écriture se révélant plus légère et plus virtuose tout au long de l'ouvrage. Violetta se rapproche ainsi de la Gilda de Rigoletto.

Ce retour à l'original sied à Patrizia Ciofi, magnifique de bout en bout. Décidément, la soprano italienne est vouée aux roles de courtisane après la Poppée de Monteverdi qu'elle vient de chanter au Théâtre des Champs-élysées. Verdi lui va mille fois mieux car il correspond à son tempérament comme aux caractéristiques de sa voix à la fois agile et colorée. Et douée surtout d'une grande sensibilité. Je n'aurai pas le mauvais gout de vanter sa plastique : disons que Robert Carsen a eu beaucoup de chance avec une artiste dont le plumage vaut le ramage.

Elle est malheureusement la seule des trois protagonistes du drame dont on puisse le dire. Les deux Germont de cette première - le ténor italo-germanique Roberto Saccà et le baryton russe Dmitri Hvorostovsky - chantent les notes constamment forte, incapables de la moindre nuance, de la moindre humanité : un comble dans cet écrin sublime ! Lorin Maazel apporte le prestige de son nom et son époustouflante technique d'orchestre sans aller au-delà d'un travail bien fait avec les musiciens comme avec les choristes.

On a connu Carsen mieux inspiré. Moderniser La Traviata n'est plus une nouveauté. Il ne suffit pas de se réclamer de Verdi qui voulait que l'ouvrage soit donné à son époque à lui Il aurait fallu trouver un équivalent. Alors Carsen durcit le trait : sa Violetta est une vraie prostituée qui n'aime que l'argent.

La voilà soeur de Lulu de Berg : expressionnisme et romantisme ne font pas bon ménage. Et cette pluie continue de billets de banque jusque dans le jardin : Carsen doit avoir un problème avec l'argent Non, décidément, La Fenice méritait mieux.

La Fenice : les 16, 18 et 19 novembre à 19 h, les 17 et 20 à 15 h 30. Tél. : 00.39.41.78.65.21, www.teatrolafenice.it. Arte retransmettra en direct la représentation du 18 novembre à 19 h.

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):