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Performances

15 Nov 2004

Le Figaro Reviews La Traviata at La Fenice: Praises Ciofi, But Not Much Else

Verdi à Las Vegas Venise : de notre envoyé spécial Jacques Doucelin [15 novembre 2004] Un de ces chats comme Venise en a le secret, trone impérial et méprisant au beau milieu d'une place ensoleillée, manteau mité, mais noeud papillon...

Verdi à Las Vegas

Venise : de notre envoyé spécial Jacques Doucelin
[15 novembre 2004]

Un de ces chats comme Venise en a le secret, trone impérial et méprisant au beau milieu d'une place ensoleillée, manteau mité, mais noeud papillon bien dessiné. Soudain, il jaillit à la verticale, moustache en bataille comme si un ressort l'avait projeté : filtrant par un regard, l'eau de la lagune vient d'atteindre son royal séant " Ce qui donne en gaulois : "Venez vite, Anna, l'eau arrive !"

L'aqua alta, la grande affaire des Vénitiens : ils jouent meme à se faire peur. En un tournemain, les planches sont mises en place pour que les touristes - Français à 90% en ce week-end de 11 novembre mâtiné de RTT - puissent circuler à pied sec. Fausse alerte ! L'eau vert amande lèche amoureusement le seuil blanc de l'église San Moïaut;se sans y pénétrer. Puis repart silencieuse comme elle est arrivée. Ainsi va la vie dans le plus beau théâtre du monde qu'est la Sérénissime.

Du théâtre, et du vrai, il y en eut la veille à La Fenice qui renaissait à l'opéra après l'incendie de 1996. Rendue à sa splendeur d'antan, la célèbre salle que l'on voit dans Senso de Visconti, fut inaugurée par un concert de Muti l'an passé (voir nos éditions du 16 décembre 2003), mais attendait toujours sa résurrection lyrique. C'est désormais chose faite avec La Traviata de Verdi, opéra emblématique de son glorieux passé. L'idée de son directeur artistique Sergio Segalini de revenir à la version de la création à Venise en 1853 constitue un attrait non négligeable de ce nouveau spectacle signé par le metteur en scène canadien Robert Carsen.

Si les différences avec l'édition remaniée dès 1854, après l'échec de l'année précédente et après un changement de distribution, ne sautent pas aux oreilles du public, elles sont d'importance pour le role-titre. On a dit souvent qu'il fallait deux voix pour chanter Violetta : dans la version d'origine, celle-ci gagne en homogénéité, l'écriture se révélant plus légère et plus virtuose tout au long de l'ouvrage. Violetta se rapproche ainsi de la Gilda de Rigoletto.

Ce retour à l'original sied à Patrizia Ciofi, magnifique de bout en bout. Décidément, la soprano italienne est vouée aux roles de courtisane après la Poppée de Monteverdi qu'elle vient de chanter au Théâtre des Champs-élysées. Verdi lui va mille fois mieux car il correspond à son tempérament comme aux caractéristiques de sa voix à la fois agile et colorée. Et douée surtout d'une grande sensibilité. Je n'aurai pas le mauvais gout de vanter sa plastique : disons que Robert Carsen a eu beaucoup de chance avec une artiste dont le plumage vaut le ramage.

Elle est malheureusement la seule des trois protagonistes du drame dont on puisse le dire. Les deux Germont de cette première - le ténor italo-germanique Roberto Saccà et le baryton russe Dmitri Hvorostovsky - chantent les notes constamment forte, incapables de la moindre nuance, de la moindre humanité : un comble dans cet écrin sublime ! Lorin Maazel apporte le prestige de son nom et son époustouflante technique d'orchestre sans aller au-delà d'un travail bien fait avec les musiciens comme avec les choristes.

On a connu Carsen mieux inspiré. Moderniser La Traviata n'est plus une nouveauté. Il ne suffit pas de se réclamer de Verdi qui voulait que l'ouvrage soit donné à son époque à lui Il aurait fallu trouver un équivalent. Alors Carsen durcit le trait : sa Violetta est une vraie prostituée qui n'aime que l'argent.

La voilà soeur de Lulu de Berg : expressionnisme et romantisme ne font pas bon ménage. Et cette pluie continue de billets de banque jusque dans le jardin : Carsen doit avoir un problème avec l'argent Non, décidément, La Fenice méritait mieux.

La Fenice : les 16, 18 et 19 novembre à 19 h, les 17 et 20 à 15 h 30. Tél. : 00.39.41.78.65.21, www.teatrolafenice.it. Arte retransmettra en direct la représentation du 18 novembre à 19 h.

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