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Performances

18 Nov 2004

Le Monde Reviews La Traviata at La Fenice: High Praise for Cast — Carsen's Production a Cliché

La Fenice refaite à neuf lance sa saison avec une "Traviata" façon années 1970 LE MONDE | 17.11.04 | 18h19 Le théâtre vénitien, rénové après l'incendie de 1996, présente l'œuvre de Verdi dans sa version originale de 1853, transformée en...

La Fenice refaite à neuf lance sa saison avec une "Traviata" façon années 1970

LE MONDE | 17.11.04 | 18h19

Le théâtre vénitien, rénové après l'incendie de 1996, présente l'œuvre de Verdi dans sa version originale de 1853, transformée en sujet d'actualité par Robert Carsen.

Venise (Italie) de notre envoyée spéciale

Il y a presque un an, la mythique Fenice de Venise renaissait de ses cendres pour la troisième fois depuis son inauguration le 16 mai 1792. Il y eut d'abord le concert d'ouverture dirigé en grande pompe le 14 décembre par Riccardo Muti, directeur artistique de la Scala de Milan (Le Monde du 16 décembre 2003), puis une semaine de réjouissances orchestrales sous les baguettes prestidigitatrices de Christian Thielemann, Myung-Whun Chung, Marcello Viotti, Mariss Jansons et Yuri Temirkanov.

Huit ans après l'incendie criminel du 29 janvier 1996 qui réduisit la salle en cendres en moins de dix heures, 60 millions d'euros et sept années de travaux plus tard, il s'agissait de rien de moins que de feter dignement les retrouvailles avec "l'âme de Venise" (Pavarotti dixit) et la rénovation à l'identique de l'un des plus beaux théâtres d'Europe. On pouvait au passage remercier Visconti : les quinze premières minutes de Senso tournées en 1954 à La Fenice, analysées, décryptées, recoupées avec les archives et les documents d'époque datant de la seconde reconstruction de 1837, ont contribué à cette minutieuse et folle reconstitution.

Les festivités passées, la saison d'opéras 2003-2004 a sagement réintégré le petit Théâtre Malibran et le grand PalaFenice jusqu'à la fin de l'année lyrique. Cette fois, c'est pour de bon : depuis le 12 novembre, qui a vu la première de La Traviata, mise en scène par Robert Carsen, il teatro ritrovato a prouvé qu'il était désormais un théâtre en ordre de marche, bien décidé à en découdre avec sa rivale de toujours, la Scala de Milan. Riche en surprises et en inédits, la saison 2004-2005 annonce d'ores et déjà du rarissime (un Omaggio a Goffredo Petrassi et Le Roi de Lahore de Massenet), du rare (Maometto secundo de Rossini, Pia de Tolomei de Donizetti et Daphné de Richard Strauss), le jeune Mozart (La Finta Semplice) cotoyant le Wagner accompli de Parsifal, sans parler de la première vénitienne d'une Grande Duchesse de Gérolstein d'Offenbach, mise en scène par Pier Luigi Pizzi.

D'APRèS ALEXANDRE DUMAS

Mais, pour l'heure, revenons à La Traviata donnée ici dans la version originale de 1853 sur un livret de Francesco Maria Piave, d'après La Dame aux camélias, d'Alexandre Dumas fils. De cette œuvre, Carsen a fait un vrai sujet d'actu situé dans les années 1970. "No future" pour Violetta la putain jet-setteuse, qui vit et meurt en escarpins et déshabillé noir, pour quelques poignées de dollars. De l'argent, il en pleut sur elle tout au long de l'opéra, que ce soit celui de ses amants, de ses amours, de ses emmerdes, et meme de la foret qui abrite un temps son idylle avec Alfredo, dont les feuilles tombent en tapis de billets de banque. Eros contre thanatos, fric contre sentiment, honnetes gens contre dégénérés, la pauvrette vivra la descente aux enfers des gens de son espèce que l'on paye de meme. Peu à peu dépossédée d'elle-meme, condamnée à crever dans un ex- appart design kitsch, en travaux, gravats parmi les gravats. C'est triste, c'est regrettable, et c'est efficace, mais ça manque fichtrement d'originalité, notamment pour ce qui concerne une direction d'acteurs on ne peut plus conventionnelle.

Heureusement, le casting est de haut niveau. Le père Germont (Dmitri Hvorostovsky) a le ton et l'aura d'un vrai commandeur, une voix qui tue au nom de la morale bourgeoise. Son fils, Alfredo, est photographe. De là à dire que l'interprétation de Roberto Saccà fait un peu cliché... Mais la voix est belle, et tant pis si la vaillance prend trop souvent le pas sur le reste, la ferveur, l'expression. Malgré les apparences, Patrizia Ciofi est nettement plus qu'une honnete femme de mauvaise vie. Sa Violetta a une belle carrure dramaturgique, et la voix, en dépit d'une légère fatigue dans l'aigu au troisième acte, sait donner corps et souffle à la belle âme sacrifiée de Violetta. Les chœurs et l'orchestre ont vaillamment relevé le défi de la direction enlevée de Lorin Maazel, lequel donne sans compter à la musique de Verdi chair, sang, vivacité et couleurs.

Marie-Aude Roux

La Traviata, de Verdi. Teatro La Fenice, Campo San Fantin, Venise (Italie). Le 16 novembre. Avec Robert Carsen (mise en scène), Patrizia Ciofi (Violetta), Roberto Saccà (Alfredo), Dmitri Hvorostovsky (Germont), Le Chœur et l'Orchestre du Gran Teatro La Fenice, Lorin Maazel (direction musicale). Prochaines représentations les 17, 18, 19 et 20 novembre. Tél. : (+39)-041-786-575.

Retransmission en direct sur Arte et sur France Musiques, le 18 novembre à 19 heures.

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