Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780393088953.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Performances

Dutch National Opera revives deliciously dark satire A Dog’s Heart

Is A Dog’s Heart even an opera? It is sung by opera singers to live music. Alexander Raskatov’s score, however, is secondary to the incredible stage visuals. Whatever it is, actor/director Simon McBurney’s first stab at opera is fantastic theatre. Its revival at Dutch National Opera, where it premiered in 2010, is hugely welcome.

María José Moreno lights up the Israeli Opera with Lucia di Lammermoor

I kept hearing from knowledgeable opera fanatics that the Israeli Opera (IO) in Tel Aviv was a surprising sure bet. So I made my way to the Homeland to hear how supposedly great the quality of opera was. And man, I was in for treat.

Cinderella Enchants Phoenix

At Phoenix’s Symphony Hall on Friday evening April 7, Arizona Opera offered its final presentation of the 2016-2017 season, Gioachino Rossini’s Cinderella (La Cenerentola). The stars of the show were Daniela Mack as Cinderella, called Angelina in the opera, and Alek Shrader as Don Ramiro. Actually, Mack and Shrader are married couple who met singing these same roles at San Francisco Opera.

LA Opera’s Young Artist Program Celebrates Tenth Anniversary

On Saturday evening April 1, 2017, Placido Domingo and Los Angeles Opera celebrated their tenth year of training young opera artists in the Domingo-Colburn-Stein Program. From the singing I heard, they definitely have something of which to be proud.

Extravagant Line-up 2017-18 at Festspielhaus in Baden-Baden, Germany

The town’s name itself “Baden-Baden” (named after Count Baden) sounds already enticing. Built against the old railway station, its Festspielhaus programs the biggest stars in opera for Germany’s largest auditorium. A Mecca for music lovers, this festival house doesn’t have its own ensemble, but through its generous sponsoring brings the great productions to the dreamy idylle.

Gerhaher and Bartoli take over Baden-Baden’s Festspielhaus

The Festspielhaus in Baden-Baden pretty much programs only big stars. A prime example was the Fall Festival this season. Grigory Sokolov opened with a piano recital, which I did not attend. I came for Cecilia Bartoli in Bellini’s Norma and Christian Gerhaher with Schubert’s Die Winterreise, and Anne-Sophie Mutter breathtakingly delivering Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto together with the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Robin Ticciati, the ballerino conductor, is not my favorite, but together they certainly impressed in Mendelssohn.

Mahler Symphony no 8 : Jurowski, LPO, Royal Festival Hall, London

Mahler as dramatist! Mahler Symphony no 8 with Vladimir Jurowski and the London Philharmonic Orchestra at the Royal Festival Hall. Now we know why Mahler didn't write opera. His music is inherently theatrical, and his dramas lie not in narrative but in internal metaphysics. The Royal Festival Hall itself played a role, literally, since the singers moved round the performance space, making the music feel particularly fluid and dynamic. This was no ordinary concert.

Rameau's Les fêtes d'Hébé, ou Les talens lyriques: a charming French-UK collaboration at the RCM

Imagine a fête galante by Jean-Antoine Watteau brought to life, its colour and movement infusing a bucolic scene with charm and theatricality. Jean-Philippe Rameau’s opéra-ballet Les fêtes d'Hébé, ou Les talens lyriques, is one such amorous pastoral allegory, its three entrées populated by shepherds and sylvans, real characters such as Sapho and mythological gods such as Mercury.

St Matthew Passion: Armonico Consort and Ian Bostridge

Whatever one’s own religious or spiritual beliefs, Bach’s St Matthew Passion is one of the most, perhaps the most, affecting depictions of the torturous final episodes of Jesus Christ’s mortal life on earth: simultaneously harrowing and beautiful, juxtaposing tender stillness with tragic urgency.

Pop Art with Abdellah Lasri in Berliner Staatsoper’s marvelous La bohème

Lindy Hume’s sensational La bohème at the Berliner Staatsoper brings out the moxie in Puccini. Abdellah Lasri emerged as a stunning discovery. He floored me with his tenor voice through which he embodied a perfect Rodolfo.

New opera Caliban banal and wearisome

Listening to Moritz Eggert’s Caliban is the equivalent of watching a flea-ridden dog chasing its own tail for one-and-half hours. It scratches, twitches and yelps. Occasionally, it blinks pleadingly, but you can’t bring yourself to care for such a foolish animal and its less-than-tragic plight.

Two rarities from the Early Opera Company at the Wigmore Hall

A large audience packed into the Wigmore Hall to hear the two Baroque rarities featured in this melodious performance by Christian Curnyn’s Early Opera Company. One was by the most distinguished ‘home-grown’ eighteenth-century musician, whose music - excepting some of the lively symphonies - remains seldom performed. The other was the work of a Saxon who - despite a few ups and downs in his relationship with the ‘natives’ - made London his home for forty-five years and invented that so English of genres, the dramatic oratorio.

Enchanting Tales at L A Opera

On March 24, 2017, Los Angeles Opera revived its co-production of Jacques Offenbach’s The Tales of Hoffmann which has also been seen at the Mariinsky Opera in Leningrad and the Washington National Opera in the District of Columbia.

Ermonela Jaho in a stunning Butterfly at Covent Garden

Ermonela Jaho is fast becoming a favourite of Covent Garden audiences, following her acclaimed appearances in the House as Mimì, Manon and Suor Angelica, and on the evidence of this terrific performance as Puccini’s Japanese ingénue, Cio-Cio-San, it’s easy to understand why. Taking the title role in the first of two casts for this fifth revival of Moshe Leiser’s and Patrice Caurier’s 2003 production of Madame Butterfly, Jaho was every inch the love-sick 15-year-old: innocent, fresh, vulnerable, her hope unfaltering, her heart unwavering.

Brave but flawed world premiere: Fortress Europe in Amsterdam

Calliope Tsoupaki’s latest opera, Fortress Europe, premiered as spring began taming the winter storms in the Mediterranean.

New Sussex Opera: A Village Romeo and Juliet

To celebrate its 40th anniversary New Sussex Opera has set itself the challenge of bringing together the six scenes - sometimes described as six discrete ‘tone poems’ - which form Delius’s A Village Romeo and Juliet into a coherent musico-dramatic narrative.

La voix humaine: Opera Holland Park at the Royal Albert Hall

Reflections on former visits to Opera Holland Park usually bring to mind late evening sunshine, peacocks, Japanese gardens, the occasional chilly gust in the pavilion and an overriding summer optimism, not to mention committed performances and strong musical and dramatic values.

London Handel Festival: Handel's Faramondo at the RCM

Written at a time when both his theatrical business and physical health were in a bad way, Handel’s Faramondo was premiered at the King’s Theatre in January 1738, fared badly and sank rapidly into obscurity where it languished until the late-twentieth century.

Brahms A German Requiem, Fabio Luisi, Barbican London

Fabio Luisi conducted the London Symphony Orchestra in Brahms A German Requiem op 45 and Schubert, Symphony no 8 in B minor D759 ("Unfinished").at the Barbican Hall, London.

Káťa Kabanová in its Seattle début

The atmosphere was a bit electric on February 25 for the opening night of Leoš Janàček’s 1921 domestic tragedy, and not entirely in a good way.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Performances

18 Nov 2004

Le Monde Reviews La Traviata at La Fenice: High Praise for Cast — Carsen's Production a Cliché

La Fenice refaite à neuf lance sa saison avec une "Traviata" façon années 1970 LE MONDE | 17.11.04 | 18h19 Le théâtre vénitien, rénové après l'incendie de 1996, présente l'œuvre de Verdi dans sa version originale de 1853, transformée en...

La Fenice refaite à neuf lance sa saison avec une "Traviata" façon années 1970

LE MONDE | 17.11.04 | 18h19

Le théâtre vénitien, rénové après l'incendie de 1996, présente l'œuvre de Verdi dans sa version originale de 1853, transformée en sujet d'actualité par Robert Carsen.

Venise (Italie) de notre envoyée spéciale

Il y a presque un an, la mythique Fenice de Venise renaissait de ses cendres pour la troisième fois depuis son inauguration le 16 mai 1792. Il y eut d'abord le concert d'ouverture dirigé en grande pompe le 14 décembre par Riccardo Muti, directeur artistique de la Scala de Milan (Le Monde du 16 décembre 2003), puis une semaine de réjouissances orchestrales sous les baguettes prestidigitatrices de Christian Thielemann, Myung-Whun Chung, Marcello Viotti, Mariss Jansons et Yuri Temirkanov.

Huit ans après l'incendie criminel du 29 janvier 1996 qui réduisit la salle en cendres en moins de dix heures, 60 millions d'euros et sept années de travaux plus tard, il s'agissait de rien de moins que de feter dignement les retrouvailles avec "l'âme de Venise" (Pavarotti dixit) et la rénovation à l'identique de l'un des plus beaux théâtres d'Europe. On pouvait au passage remercier Visconti : les quinze premières minutes de Senso tournées en 1954 à La Fenice, analysées, décryptées, recoupées avec les archives et les documents d'époque datant de la seconde reconstruction de 1837, ont contribué à cette minutieuse et folle reconstitution.

Les festivités passées, la saison d'opéras 2003-2004 a sagement réintégré le petit Théâtre Malibran et le grand PalaFenice jusqu'à la fin de l'année lyrique. Cette fois, c'est pour de bon : depuis le 12 novembre, qui a vu la première de La Traviata, mise en scène par Robert Carsen, il teatro ritrovato a prouvé qu'il était désormais un théâtre en ordre de marche, bien décidé à en découdre avec sa rivale de toujours, la Scala de Milan. Riche en surprises et en inédits, la saison 2004-2005 annonce d'ores et déjà du rarissime (un Omaggio a Goffredo Petrassi et Le Roi de Lahore de Massenet), du rare (Maometto secundo de Rossini, Pia de Tolomei de Donizetti et Daphné de Richard Strauss), le jeune Mozart (La Finta Semplice) cotoyant le Wagner accompli de Parsifal, sans parler de la première vénitienne d'une Grande Duchesse de Gérolstein d'Offenbach, mise en scène par Pier Luigi Pizzi.

D'APRèS ALEXANDRE DUMAS

Mais, pour l'heure, revenons à La Traviata donnée ici dans la version originale de 1853 sur un livret de Francesco Maria Piave, d'après La Dame aux camélias, d'Alexandre Dumas fils. De cette œuvre, Carsen a fait un vrai sujet d'actu situé dans les années 1970. "No future" pour Violetta la putain jet-setteuse, qui vit et meurt en escarpins et déshabillé noir, pour quelques poignées de dollars. De l'argent, il en pleut sur elle tout au long de l'opéra, que ce soit celui de ses amants, de ses amours, de ses emmerdes, et meme de la foret qui abrite un temps son idylle avec Alfredo, dont les feuilles tombent en tapis de billets de banque. Eros contre thanatos, fric contre sentiment, honnetes gens contre dégénérés, la pauvrette vivra la descente aux enfers des gens de son espèce que l'on paye de meme. Peu à peu dépossédée d'elle-meme, condamnée à crever dans un ex- appart design kitsch, en travaux, gravats parmi les gravats. C'est triste, c'est regrettable, et c'est efficace, mais ça manque fichtrement d'originalité, notamment pour ce qui concerne une direction d'acteurs on ne peut plus conventionnelle.

Heureusement, le casting est de haut niveau. Le père Germont (Dmitri Hvorostovsky) a le ton et l'aura d'un vrai commandeur, une voix qui tue au nom de la morale bourgeoise. Son fils, Alfredo, est photographe. De là à dire que l'interprétation de Roberto Saccà fait un peu cliché... Mais la voix est belle, et tant pis si la vaillance prend trop souvent le pas sur le reste, la ferveur, l'expression. Malgré les apparences, Patrizia Ciofi est nettement plus qu'une honnete femme de mauvaise vie. Sa Violetta a une belle carrure dramaturgique, et la voix, en dépit d'une légère fatigue dans l'aigu au troisième acte, sait donner corps et souffle à la belle âme sacrifiée de Violetta. Les chœurs et l'orchestre ont vaillamment relevé le défi de la direction enlevée de Lorin Maazel, lequel donne sans compter à la musique de Verdi chair, sang, vivacité et couleurs.

Marie-Aude Roux

La Traviata, de Verdi. Teatro La Fenice, Campo San Fantin, Venise (Italie). Le 16 novembre. Avec Robert Carsen (mise en scène), Patrizia Ciofi (Violetta), Roberto Saccà (Alfredo), Dmitri Hvorostovsky (Germont), Le Chœur et l'Orchestre du Gran Teatro La Fenice, Lorin Maazel (direction musicale). Prochaines représentations les 17, 18, 19 et 20 novembre. Tél. : (+39)-041-786-575.

Retransmission en direct sur Arte et sur France Musiques, le 18 novembre à 19 heures.

[Click here for related article.]

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):