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OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Performances

30 Nov 2004

Pierre Jourdan Resurrects Haÿdée at Compiègne

OPéRA "Hayedée" à Compiègne Auber sort de l'oubli Jacques Doucelin [Le Figaro] [30 novembre 2004] Et de cinq ! Après Manon Lescaut, Gustave III, Le Domino noir et Les Diamants de la couronne entre 1990 et 1999, Pierre Jourdan vient...

OPéRA "Hayedée" à Compiègne
Auber sort de l'oubli

Jacques Doucelin [Le Figaro]
[30 novembre 2004]

Et de cinq ! Après Manon Lescaut, Gustave III, Le Domino noir et Les Diamants de la couronne entre 1990 et 1999, Pierre Jourdan vient de ressusciter un autre opéra oublié d'Auber, Hayedée ou le secret. Ce n'est point manie, mais respect d'une promesse faite voici quinze ans : défendre et illustrer le répertoire lyrique français par le Théâtre français pour la musique installé dans le Théâtre impérial de Compiègne lui-meme achevé et rendu à sa destination première grâce à l'acharnement du meme Pierre Jourdan. Un homme orchestre qui sait aussi bien gérer une salle, équilibrer une programmation qu'inculquer le beau style aux jeunes chanteurs dont il complète la formation.

Ajoutons que cet ancien réalisateur de télévision s'entend à assurer la rentabilité artistique de ses spectacles diffusés en DVD. Sans compter sa vocation d'ambassadeur du chant français à l'étranger par l'invitation de plusieurs productions au Covent Garden de Londres. On s'étonne qu'aucune synergie ne soit encore née avec l'Opéra-Comique dont Compiègne défend le répertoire de façon exemplaire. Favart ayant été promu Epic (Etablissement public à vocation industrielle et commerciale) et doté d'un budget artistique, les choses devraient changer.

Ce qui frappe dans Hayedée comme dans Noé de Bizet et d'Halévy (Le Figaro des 8 et 19 octobre) c'est l'homogénéité. Si Jourdan ne peut s'offrir Alagna ou Dessay, il compense par un travail de fond sur le style. A la tete du jeune et excellent orchestre Albéric Magnard. il a placé Michel Swierczewski qui ressuscita déjà Christophe Colomb pour le centenaire de Milhaud en 1992 avec pour héros un certain Laurent Naouri qui a fait son chemin depuis !

Ce chef d'expérience aime cette musique et sait la faire aimer. Ce qu'on voit est au diapason, des superbes toiles d'André Brasilier aux riches costumes de Pierre Capeyron. Isabelle Philippe campe une Hayedée à l'aigu facile au coté d'Anne-Sophie Schmidt plus à l'aise en Rafaela que dans Noé. Dans le role effroyable de Lorédan, le jeune ténor Bruno Comparetti témoigne d'un courage souvent récompensé et d'un vrai style. Il est bien entouré par le gentil ténor Mathias Vidal et la méchante basse Paul Medioni.

Comment sauver le livret aussi "tarte" de Scribe ? Du pire vaudeville qui ne prend pas la tete, mais exaspère : on se dit qu'il faudrait couper les dialogues parlés Pas d'originalité, mais des airs bien troussés comme celui dont on sait qu'il fera le tour des faubourgs et que sa partition se vendra dans les salons bourgeois : ainsi allait la publicité dans un siècle sans télévision et sans cinéma. Voilà qui explique l'énorme succès en Europe : 500 représentations rien qu'à Paris ! Pourquoi ? Le public a toujours préféré Salieri à Mozart.

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