Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Performances

Rameau Grand Motets, BBC Proms

Best of the season so far! William Christie and Les Arts Florissants performed Rameau Grand Motets at late night Prom 17. Perfection, as one would expect from arguably the finest Rameau interpreters in the business, and that's saying a lot, given the exceptionally high quality of French baroque performance in the last 40 years.

Adriana Lecouvreur Opera Holland Park

Twelve years after Opera Holland Park's first production of Francesco Cilea's Adriana Lecouvreur, the opera made a welcome return.

Back to the Beginnings: Monteverdi’s Il ritorno d’Ulisse in patria at Iford Opera.

The Italianate cloister setting at Iford chimes neatly with Monteverdi’s penultimate opera The Return of Ulysses, as the setting cannot but bring to mind those early days of the musical genre. The world of commercial public opera had only just dawned with the opening of the Teatro San Cassiano in Venice in 1637 and for the first time opera became open to all who could afford a ticket, rather than beholden to the patronage of generous princes. Monteverdi took full advantage of the new stage and at the age of 73 brought all his experience of more than 30 years of opera-writing since his ground-breaking L’Orfeo (what a pity we have lost all those works) to the creation of two of his greatest pieces, Ulysses and then his final masterpiece, Poppea.

Schoenberg : Moses und Aron, Welsh National Opera, London

Once again, we find ourselves thanking an unrepresentable being for Welsh National Opera’s commitment to its mission. It is a sad state of affairs when a season that includes both Boulevard Solitude and Moses und Aron is considered exceptional, but it is - and is all the more so when one contrasts such seriousness of purpose with the endless revivals of La traviata which, Die Frau ohne Schatten notwithstanding, seem to occupy so much of the Royal Opera’s effort. That said, if the Royal Opera has not undertaken what would be only its second ever staging of Schoenberg’s masterpiece - the first and last was in 1965, long before most of us were born! - then at least it has engaged in a very welcome ‘WNO at the Royal Opera House’ relationship, in which we in London shall have the opportunity to see some of the fruits of the more adventurous company’s endeavours.

Rossini is Alive and Well and Living in Iowa

If you don’t have the means to get to the Rossini festival in Pesaro, you would do just as well to come to Indianola, Iowa, where Des Moines Metro Opera festival has devised a heady production of Le Comte Ory that is as long on belly laughs as it is on musical fireworks.

Gergiev : Janáček Glagolitic Mass, BBC Proms

Composed during just a few weeks of the summer of 1926, Janáček’s Slavonic-text Glagolitic Mass was first performed in Brno in December 1927. During the rehearsals for the premiere - just 3 for the orchestra and one 3-hour rehearsal for the whole ensemble - the composer made many changes, and such alterations continued so that by the time of the only other performance during Janáček’s lifetime, in Prague in April 1928, many of the instrumental (especially brass) lines had been doubled, complex rhythmic patterns had been ‘ironed-out’ (the Kyrie was originally in 5/4 time), a passage for 3 off-stage clarinets had been cut along with music for 3 sets of pedal timpani, and choral passages were also excised.

Donizetti and Mozart, Jette Parker Young Artists Royal Opera House, London

With the conclusion of the ROH 2013-14 season on Saturday evening - John Copley’s 40-year old production of La Bohème bringing down the summer curtain - the sun pouring through the gleaming windows of the Floral Hall was a welcome invitation to enjoy a final treat. The Jette Parker Young Artists Summer Showcase offered singers whom we have admired in minor and supporting roles during the past year the opportunity to step into the spotlight.

Glyndebourne's Strauss Der Rosenkavalier, BBC Proms

Many words have already been spent - not all of them on musical matters - on Richard Jones’s Glyndebourne production of Der Rosenkavalier, which last night was transported to the Royal Albert Hall. This was the first time at the Proms that Richard Strauss’s most popular opera had been heard in its entirety and, despite losing two of its principals in transit from Sussex to SW1, this semi-staged performance offered little to fault and much to admire.

Il turco in Italia at the Aix Festival

Twenty years ago stage director Christopher Alden introduced Rossini’s then forgotten comedy to Southern California audiences in a production that is still remembered. In Aix Alden has revisited this complex work that many critics now consider Rossini’s greatest comedy.

First Night of the BBC Proms : Elgar The Kingdom

The BBC Proms 2014 season began with Sir Edward Elgars The Kingdom (1903-6). It was a good start to the season,which commemorates the start of the First World War. From that perspective Sir Andrew Davis's The Kingdom moved me deeply.

Le nozze di Figaro, Munich

One is unlikely to come across a cast of Figaro principals much better than this today, and the virtues of this performance indeed proved to be primarily vocal.

Winterreise and Trauernacht at the Aix Festival

That’s A Winter’s Journey and A Night of Mourning for metteurs-en-scène William Kentridge (South Africa) and Katie Mitchell (Great Britain), completing the clean sweep of English language stage directors for the Aix Festival productions this year.

James Gilchrist at Wigmore Hall

Assured elegance, care and thoughtfulness characterised tenor James Gilchrist’s performance of Schubert’s Schwanengesang at the Wigmore Hall, the cycles’ two poets framing a compelling interpretation of Beethoven’s An die ferne Geliebte.

Music for a While: Improvisations on Henry Purcell

‘Music for a while shall all your cares beguile.’ Dryden’s words have never seemed as apt as at the conclusion of this wonderful sequence of improvisations on Purcell’s songs and arias, interspersed with instrumental chaconnes and toccatas, by L’Arpeggiata.

Nabucco at Orange

The acoustic of the gigantic Théâtre Antique Romain at Orange cannot but astonish its nine thousand spectators, the nearly one hundred meter breadth of the its proscenium inspires awe. There was excited anticipation for this performance of Verdi’s first masterpiece.

Saint Louis: A Hit is a Hit is a Hit

Opera Theatre of Saint Louis has once again staked claim to being the summer festival “of choice” in the US, not least of all for having mounted another superlative world premiere.

La Flûte Enchantée (2e Acte)
at the Aix Festival

In past years the operas of the Aix Festival that took place in the Grand Théâtre de Provence began at 8 pm. The Magic Flute began at 7 pm, or would have had not the infamous intermittents (seasonal theatrical employees) demanded to speak to the audience.

Ariodante at the Aix Festival

High drama in Aix. Three scenarios in conflict — those of G.F. Handel, Richard Jones and the intermittents (disgruntled seasonal theatrical employees). Make that four — mother nature.

Lucy Crowe, Wigmore Hall

The programme declared that ‘music, water and night’ was the connecting thread running through this diverse collection of songs, performed by soprano Lucy Crowe and pianist Anna Tilbrook, but in fact there was little need to seek a unifying element for these eclectic works allowed Crowe to demonstrate her expressive range — and offered the audience the opportunity to hear some interesting rarities.

The Turn of the Screw, Holland Park

‘Only make the reader’s general vision of evil intense enough … and his own experience, his own imagination, his own sympathy … will supply him quite sufficiently with all the particulars.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Performances

12 Dec 2004

Don Carlo a Firenze

Firenze, teatro Comunale. Si rappresenta il Don Carlo nell'edizione in cinque atti, con la ricostruzione dello storico allestimento di Luchino Visconti. A metà del secondo atto il sipario si chiude per il cambio di scena. Mezze luci in sala, Zubin...

Firenze, teatro Comunale. Si rappresenta il Don Carlo nell'edizione in cinque atti, con la ricostruzione dello storico allestimento di Luchino Visconti. A metà del secondo atto il sipario si chiude per il cambio di scena. Mezze luci in sala, Zubin Mehta non abbandona il podio. Il sommesso scambio di chiacchiere in platea e nelle due gallerie si smorza all'improvviso quando un signore con un microfono in mano esce al proscenio e legge un comunicato che grosso modo dice: il teatro fiorentino censura con forza i tagli ai finanziamenti decisi dal governo e, piu in generale, la sempre minor considerazione che ricevono oggi la cultura e soprattutto il teatro d'opera. Ricorda che il teatro stesso è una casa che dà lavoro a centinaia di persone, le quali hanno deciso di rivelarsi al pubblico non con uno sciopero ma mostrando almeno una parte del lavoro che sta "dietro" lo spettacolo che sta andando in scena.

Il sipario si riapre e il cambio avviene a scena aperta. In pochi minuti decine di macchinisti demoliscono la gigantesca tomba di Carlo V nella chiesa di San Giusto e costruiscono al suo posto l'incredibile prospettiva del chiostro, dove Eboli dovrà intrattenere le dame della corte. E mentre giganteschi pilastri gotici si scoprono dipinti su tela e salgono al cielo, mentre calano le arcate del portico e i cipressi che si alzano nel fondo, mentre l'enorme cancellata d'oro che circondava la tomba viene assicurata a funi e fatta letteralmente volar via, scrosciano gli applausi di un pubblico stupefatto e solidale.

Questa imprevista divagazione nella rappresentazione è stata, al di là del suo significato primo e politico, una vera lezione di teatro, un momento che gli spettatori in sala ricorderanno per molto tempo. E, per di piu, incastonato in uno spettacolo straordinario.

Il Comunale di Firenze ha deciso di rappresentare, a giorni alterni e con due cast diversi, la versione in cinque atti e quella in quattro. Come al solito, quando si decide di rappresentare il Don Carlo si finisce sempre per combinare qualche pasticcio col testo utilizzato: evidentemente non basta decidere per una delle diverse versioni disponibili, da quella di Parigi, ovviamente in francese, in cinque atti e col ballo ma con brani eliminati da Verdi dopo la prova generale per accorciare la durata dello spettacolo, a quelle italiane: Bologna 1867, cinque atti col ballo, semplice traduzione in italiano della versione francese; Milano 1884, ridotta a quattro atti; Modena 1886, riportata a cinque atti ma senza ballo. Nel mezzo, altre modifiche apportate in occasione di una ripresa napoletana. Quella rappresentata a Firenze assieme alla versione di Milano (alla quale pero, se ho capito bene, è stata tagliata l'aria del tenore nel primo atto) è stata nella sostanza la versione di Modena ma con l'aggiunta, come si era fatto alla Fenice nel 1973 e alla Scala nel '77, di due dei brani che Verdi aveva tagliato, solo per ragioni pratiche, prima della prima rappresentazione assoluta: il coro di apertura nel bosco di Fointanbleau e il grande concertato in morte di Posa. Brano a cui Verdi teneva evidentemente molto, visto che tolto dal Don Carlos divenne poi il Lacrymosa della Messa di Requiem. Queste contaminazioni fra versioni diverse mi lasciano sempre perplesso. Non sarebbe piu semplice e corretto decidere per una delle possibili versioni autentiche ed eseguirla sic et simpliciter? E, meglio ancora, non sarebbe ora che qualcuno si decidesse a mettere in scena il primo Don Carlos, quello che ando in scena una volta sola alla prova generale dell'opera?

Quante cose si capiscono vedendo, pur con tutte le sue inevitabili approssimazioni rispetto all'originale, questa ricostruzione di uno dei piu celebri allestimenti di Luchino Visconti! Intanto chi non ha l'età per averne fatto esperienza diretta si trova davanti all'immagine evidente di come si faceva spettacolo d'opera fino agli anni Sessanta, e con essa coglie la vera essenza del grande repertorio italiano, il suo essere manifestazione di una cultura popolare che nella grande mogeneizzazione/americanizzazione/standardizzazione di oggi non esiste piu.

Non è facile, adesso, abbandonarsi con atteggiamento "vergine" a queste scene dipinte, a questa assenza di sovrastrutture intellettualistiche, a questo gusto per l'oleografia, a questo modo di fare regia che ha soprattutto due obiettivi che i registi di oggi nemmeno prendono in considerazione. Il primo: concepire movimenti che rispettino le indicazioni del libretto e i suggerimenti dello spartito e raccontino la storia nella maniera il piu possibile chiara e coinvolgente. Il secondo: cogliere le potenzialità spettacolari del libretto e con lui (e non contro di lui o nonostante lui) costruire, per successive aggiunte, quei tableaux vivants che sono una delle caratteristiche drammaturgiche imprescindibili del grand-opéra. Nello spettacolo di Visconti i quadri finali della scena dell'autodafè e del carcere toglievano il respiro tanto erano belli. E realizzati grazie all'ammirevole padronanza della tecnica registica vera, quella che sa muovere e comporre le masse, che sa recuperare i riferimenti figurativi appropriati, che sa cogliere nel testo i suggerimenti per il proprio contributo senza la patetica pretesa di sovrapporre ad esso drammaturgie alternative spesso inconsistenti.

La realizzazione musicale è stata complessivamente di altissimo livello. Non posso purtroppo andare oltre un giudizio genericamente positivo sulla direzione di Zubin Mehta, poiché credo che la mia collocazione nella sala, proprio sopra la banda degli ottoni e le percussioni, abbia falsato parecchio la mia percezione del contributo orchestrale. Immagino che chi stava in posti meno infelici da questo punto di vista abbia sentito un'orchestra molto piu equilibrata di quanto non abbia sentito io.

Al vertice del cast la Eboli di Violeta Urmana e la Elisabetta di Barbara Frittoli. La prima ha un timbro sfarzoso di mezzosoprano unito a una incredibile facilità nel registro acuto che le ha guadagnato vere e proprie ovazioni dopo un trascinante finale di O don fatale. Barbara Frittoli ha una presenza vocale obiettivamente meno consistente, sia per volume che per bellezza del colore. Il personaggio, poi, deve attendere il quinto atto per giocare la sua grande carta. Ma la sua è stata un'Elisabetta giovane, bellissima, piagata e vocalmente impeccabile. Tu che le vanità è stato un momento di grande commozione, anch'esso salutato da un applauso trionfale.

Roberto Scandiuzzi, Filippo II, ha cominciato non bene, con qualche muggito e accenti rudi e poco convincenti, ma è rientrato ben presto nei ranghi e ha fatto un Filippo duro e giovanile, di grande presenza vocale e scenica.

Fabio Armiliato ha dato una prova efficiente, forse non molto approfondita dal punto di vista dell'interpretazione (la fragilità nervosa del personaggio latitava) ma vocalmente sicura e teatralmente disinvolta. Armiliato è un cantante affidabile, che non si strozza negli acuti e recita e interpreta sia col corpo che con la voce. Bisogna dargli atto che senza essere un fuoriclasse ha saputo dare a quest'immensa opera un protagonista efficace.

Meno significativo il Posa dell'ormai onnipresente Carlo Guelfi, statico sia fisicamente che vocalmente e con una discutibilissima e fastidiosa propensione a mettere la voce nel naso. Il timbro, poi, è comune e poco si addice al nobilissimo personaggio di Rodrigo. Gli va dato atto di aver eseguito i molti trilli previsti dalla partitura, o almeno di averci provato. La resa del personaggio, pero, era incompleta.

Nel complesso, comunque, si è trattato di una serata memorabile, nel corso della quale l'immenso affresco verdiano ha ricevuto una realizzazione fra le migliori oggi possibili.

Riccardo Domenichini

Don Carlo will be broadcast by Radio 3 on 16 December at 1800 GMT. Click here for details.

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):