Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780393088953.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Performances

As One a Haunting Success in San Diego

San Diego Opera has mined solid gold with its mesmerizing and affecting production of As One, a part of their innovative ‘Detour Series.’

OLF: Songs by Tchaikovsky, Anton Rubinstein, Rachmaninov and Georgy Sviridov

Compared to the oft-explored world of German lieder and French chansons, the songs of Russia are unfairly neglected in recordings and in the concert hall. The raw emotion and expansive lyricism present in much of this repertoire was clearly in evidence at the Holywell Music Room for the penultimate day of the celebrated Oxford Lieder Festival.

Stockhausen’s STIMMUNG and COSMIC PULSES at the Barbican.

This concert was an event on several levels - marking a decade since the death of Stockhausen, the fortieth anniversary (almost to the day) since Singcircle first performed STIMMUNG (at the Round House), and their final public performance of the piece. It was also a rare opportunity to hear (and see) Stockhausen’s last completed purely electronic work, COSMIC PULSES - an overwhelming visual and aural experience that anyone who was at this concert will long remember.

Nico Muhly's Marnie at ENO

Winston Graham’s 1961 novel Marnie was bold for its time. Its themes of sexual repression, psychological suspense and criminality set within the dark social fabric of contemporary Britain are but outlier themes of the anti-heroine’s own narrative of deceit, guilt, multiple identities and blackmail.

TOSCA: A Dramatic Sing-Fest

On November 12, 2017, Arizona Opera presented Giacomo Puccini’s verismo opera, Tosca, in a dramatic production directed by Tara Faircloth. Her production utilized realistic scenery from Seattle Opera and detailed costumes from the New York City Opera. Gregory Allen Hirsch’s lighting made the set look like the church of St. Andrea as some of us may have remembered it from time gone by.

The Lighthouse: Shadwell Opera at Hackney Showroom

‘Only make the reader’s general vision of evil intense enough … and his own experience, his own imagination, his own sympathy … and horror … will supply him quite sufficiently with all the particulars. Make him think the evil, make him think it for himself, and you are released from weak specifications.’

Elisabeth Kulman sings Mahler's Rückert-Lieder with Sir Mark Elder and the Britten Sinfonia

Austrian singer Elisabeth Kulman has had an interesting career trajectory. She began her singing life as a soprano but later shifted to mezzo-soprano/contralto territory. Esteemed on the operatic stage, she relinquished the theatre for the concert platform in 2015, following an accident while rehearsing Tristan.

Tremendous revival of Katie Mitchell's Lucia at the ROH

The morning sickness, miscarriage and maundering wraiths are still present, but Katie Mitchell’s Lucia di Lammermoor, receiving its first revival at the ROH, seems less ‘hysterical’ this time round - and all the more harrowing for it.

Manon in San Francisco

Nothing but a wall and a floor (and an enormous battery of unseen lighting instruments) and two perfectly matched artists, the Manon of soprano Ellie Dehn and the des Grieux of tenor Michael Fabiano, the centerpiece of Paris’ operatic Belle Époque found vibrant presence on the War Memorial stage.

A beguiling Il barbiere di Siviglia from GTO

I had mixed feelings about Annabel Arden’s production of Il barbiere di Siviglia when it was first seen at Glyndebourne in 2016. Now reprised (revival director, Sinéad O’Neill) for the autumn 2017 tour, the designs remain a vibrant mosaic of rich hues and Moorish motifs, the supernumeraries - commedia stereotypes cum comic interlopers - infiltrate and interact even more piquantly, and the harpsichords are still flying in, unfathomably, from all angles. But, the drama is a little less hyperactive, the characterisation less larger-than-life. And, this Saturday evening performance went down a treat with the Canterbury crowd on the final night of GTO’s brief residency at the Marlowe Theatre.

Brett Dean's Hamlet: GTO in Canterbury

‘There is no such thing as Hamlet,’ says Matthew Jocelyn in an interview printed in the 2017 Glyndebourne programme book. The librettist of Australian composer Brett Dean’s opera based on the Bard’s most oft-performed tragedy, which was premiered to acclaim in June this year, was noting the variants between the extant sources for the play - the First, or ‘Bad’, Quarto of 1603, which contains just over half of the text of the Second Quarto which published the following year, and the First Folio of 1623 - no one of which can reliably be guaranteed superiority over the other.

WNO's Russian Revolution series: the grim repetitions of the house of the dead

‘We lived in a heap together in one barrack. The flooring was rotten and an inch deep in filth, so that we slipped and fell. When wood was put into the stove no heat came out, only a terrible smell that lasted through the winter.’ So wrote Dostoevsky, in a letter to his brother, about his experiences in the Siberian prison camp at Omsk where he was incarcerated between 1850-54, because of his association with a group of political dissidents who had tried to assassinate the Tsar. Dostoevsky’s ‘house of the dead’ is harrowingly reproduced by Maria Björsen’s set - a dark, Dantesque pit from which there is no possibility of escape - for David Pountney’s 1982 production of Janáček’s final opera, here revived as part of Welsh National Opera’s Russian Revolution series.

The 2017 Glyndebourne Tour arrives in Canterbury with a satisfying Così fan tutte

A Così fan tutte set in the 18th century, in Naples, beside the sea: what, no meddling with Mozart? Whatever next! First seen in 2006, and now on its final run before ‘retirement’, Nicholas Hytner’s straightforward account (revived by Bruno Ravella) of Mozart’s part-playful, part-piquant tale of amorous entanglements was a refreshing opener at the Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury where Glyndebourne Festival Opera arrived this week for the first sojourn of the 2017 tour.

Richard Jones's Rodelinda returns to ENO

Shameless grabs for power; vicious, self-destructive dynastic in-fighting; a self-righteous and unwavering sense of entitlement; bruised egos and integrity jettisoned. One might be forgiven for thinking that it was the current Tory government that was being described. However, we are not in twenty-first-century Westminster, but rather in seventh-century Lombardy, the setting for Handel’s 1725 opera, Rodelinda, Richard Jones’s 2014 production of which is currently being revived at English National Opera.

Amusing Old Movie Becomes Engrossing New Opera

Director Mario Bava’s motion picture, Hercules in the Haunted World, was released in Italy in November 1961, and in the United States in April 1964. In 2010 composer Patrick Morganelli wrote a chamber opera entitled Hercules vs. Vampires for Opera Theater Oregon.

Rigoletto at Lyric Opera of Chicago

If a credible portrayal of the title character in Giuseppe Verdi’s Rigoletto is vital to any performance, the success of Lyric Opera of Chicago’s current, exciting production hinges very much on the memorable court jester and father sung by baritone Quinn Kelsey.

Wexford Festival Opera 2017

‘What’s the delay? A little wind and rain are nothing to worry about!’ The villagers’ indifference to the inclement weather which occurs mid-way through Jacopo Foroni’s opera Margherita - as the townsfolk set off in pursuit of two mystery assailants seen attacking a man in the forest - acquired an unintentionally ironic slant in Wexford Opera House on the opening night of Michael Sturm’s production, raising a wry chuckle from the audience.

The Genius of Purcell: Carolyn Sampson and The King's Consort at the Wigmore Hall

This celebration of The Genius of Purcell by Carolyn Sampson and The King’s Consort at the Wigmore Hall was music-making of the most absorbing and invigorating kind: unmannered, direct and refreshing.

Classical Opera/The Mozartists celebrate 20 years of music-making

Classical Opera celebrated 20 years of music-making and story-telling with a characteristically ambitious and eclectic sequence of musical works at the Barbican Hall. Themes of creation and renewal were to the fore, and after a first half comprising a variety of vocal works and short poems, ‘Classical Opera’ were succeeded by their complementary alter ego, ‘The Mozartists’, in the second part of the concert for a rousing performance of Beethoven’s Choral Symphony - a work described by Page as ‘in many ways the most iconic work in the repertoire’.

Back to Baroque and to the battle lines with English Touring Opera

Romeo and Juliet, Rinaldo and Armida, Ramadès and Aida: love thwarted by warring countries and families is a perennial trope of literature, myth and history. Indeed, ‘Love and war are all one,’ declared Miguel de Cervantes in Don Quixote, a sentiment which seems to be particularly exemplified by the world of baroque opera with its penchant for plundering Classical Greek and Roman myths for their extreme passions and conflicts. English Touring Opera’s 2017 autumn tour takes us back to the Baroque and back to the battle-lines.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Performances

12 Dec 2004

Don Carlo a Firenze

Firenze, teatro Comunale. Si rappresenta il Don Carlo nell'edizione in cinque atti, con la ricostruzione dello storico allestimento di Luchino Visconti. A metà del secondo atto il sipario si chiude per il cambio di scena. Mezze luci in sala, Zubin...

Firenze, teatro Comunale. Si rappresenta il Don Carlo nell'edizione in cinque atti, con la ricostruzione dello storico allestimento di Luchino Visconti. A metà del secondo atto il sipario si chiude per il cambio di scena. Mezze luci in sala, Zubin Mehta non abbandona il podio. Il sommesso scambio di chiacchiere in platea e nelle due gallerie si smorza all'improvviso quando un signore con un microfono in mano esce al proscenio e legge un comunicato che grosso modo dice: il teatro fiorentino censura con forza i tagli ai finanziamenti decisi dal governo e, piu in generale, la sempre minor considerazione che ricevono oggi la cultura e soprattutto il teatro d'opera. Ricorda che il teatro stesso è una casa che dà lavoro a centinaia di persone, le quali hanno deciso di rivelarsi al pubblico non con uno sciopero ma mostrando almeno una parte del lavoro che sta "dietro" lo spettacolo che sta andando in scena.

Il sipario si riapre e il cambio avviene a scena aperta. In pochi minuti decine di macchinisti demoliscono la gigantesca tomba di Carlo V nella chiesa di San Giusto e costruiscono al suo posto l'incredibile prospettiva del chiostro, dove Eboli dovrà intrattenere le dame della corte. E mentre giganteschi pilastri gotici si scoprono dipinti su tela e salgono al cielo, mentre calano le arcate del portico e i cipressi che si alzano nel fondo, mentre l'enorme cancellata d'oro che circondava la tomba viene assicurata a funi e fatta letteralmente volar via, scrosciano gli applausi di un pubblico stupefatto e solidale.

Questa imprevista divagazione nella rappresentazione è stata, al di là del suo significato primo e politico, una vera lezione di teatro, un momento che gli spettatori in sala ricorderanno per molto tempo. E, per di piu, incastonato in uno spettacolo straordinario.

Il Comunale di Firenze ha deciso di rappresentare, a giorni alterni e con due cast diversi, la versione in cinque atti e quella in quattro. Come al solito, quando si decide di rappresentare il Don Carlo si finisce sempre per combinare qualche pasticcio col testo utilizzato: evidentemente non basta decidere per una delle diverse versioni disponibili, da quella di Parigi, ovviamente in francese, in cinque atti e col ballo ma con brani eliminati da Verdi dopo la prova generale per accorciare la durata dello spettacolo, a quelle italiane: Bologna 1867, cinque atti col ballo, semplice traduzione in italiano della versione francese; Milano 1884, ridotta a quattro atti; Modena 1886, riportata a cinque atti ma senza ballo. Nel mezzo, altre modifiche apportate in occasione di una ripresa napoletana. Quella rappresentata a Firenze assieme alla versione di Milano (alla quale pero, se ho capito bene, è stata tagliata l'aria del tenore nel primo atto) è stata nella sostanza la versione di Modena ma con l'aggiunta, come si era fatto alla Fenice nel 1973 e alla Scala nel '77, di due dei brani che Verdi aveva tagliato, solo per ragioni pratiche, prima della prima rappresentazione assoluta: il coro di apertura nel bosco di Fointanbleau e il grande concertato in morte di Posa. Brano a cui Verdi teneva evidentemente molto, visto che tolto dal Don Carlos divenne poi il Lacrymosa della Messa di Requiem. Queste contaminazioni fra versioni diverse mi lasciano sempre perplesso. Non sarebbe piu semplice e corretto decidere per una delle possibili versioni autentiche ed eseguirla sic et simpliciter? E, meglio ancora, non sarebbe ora che qualcuno si decidesse a mettere in scena il primo Don Carlos, quello che ando in scena una volta sola alla prova generale dell'opera?

Quante cose si capiscono vedendo, pur con tutte le sue inevitabili approssimazioni rispetto all'originale, questa ricostruzione di uno dei piu celebri allestimenti di Luchino Visconti! Intanto chi non ha l'età per averne fatto esperienza diretta si trova davanti all'immagine evidente di come si faceva spettacolo d'opera fino agli anni Sessanta, e con essa coglie la vera essenza del grande repertorio italiano, il suo essere manifestazione di una cultura popolare che nella grande mogeneizzazione/americanizzazione/standardizzazione di oggi non esiste piu.

Non è facile, adesso, abbandonarsi con atteggiamento "vergine" a queste scene dipinte, a questa assenza di sovrastrutture intellettualistiche, a questo gusto per l'oleografia, a questo modo di fare regia che ha soprattutto due obiettivi che i registi di oggi nemmeno prendono in considerazione. Il primo: concepire movimenti che rispettino le indicazioni del libretto e i suggerimenti dello spartito e raccontino la storia nella maniera il piu possibile chiara e coinvolgente. Il secondo: cogliere le potenzialità spettacolari del libretto e con lui (e non contro di lui o nonostante lui) costruire, per successive aggiunte, quei tableaux vivants che sono una delle caratteristiche drammaturgiche imprescindibili del grand-opéra. Nello spettacolo di Visconti i quadri finali della scena dell'autodafè e del carcere toglievano il respiro tanto erano belli. E realizzati grazie all'ammirevole padronanza della tecnica registica vera, quella che sa muovere e comporre le masse, che sa recuperare i riferimenti figurativi appropriati, che sa cogliere nel testo i suggerimenti per il proprio contributo senza la patetica pretesa di sovrapporre ad esso drammaturgie alternative spesso inconsistenti.

La realizzazione musicale è stata complessivamente di altissimo livello. Non posso purtroppo andare oltre un giudizio genericamente positivo sulla direzione di Zubin Mehta, poiché credo che la mia collocazione nella sala, proprio sopra la banda degli ottoni e le percussioni, abbia falsato parecchio la mia percezione del contributo orchestrale. Immagino che chi stava in posti meno infelici da questo punto di vista abbia sentito un'orchestra molto piu equilibrata di quanto non abbia sentito io.

Al vertice del cast la Eboli di Violeta Urmana e la Elisabetta di Barbara Frittoli. La prima ha un timbro sfarzoso di mezzosoprano unito a una incredibile facilità nel registro acuto che le ha guadagnato vere e proprie ovazioni dopo un trascinante finale di O don fatale. Barbara Frittoli ha una presenza vocale obiettivamente meno consistente, sia per volume che per bellezza del colore. Il personaggio, poi, deve attendere il quinto atto per giocare la sua grande carta. Ma la sua è stata un'Elisabetta giovane, bellissima, piagata e vocalmente impeccabile. Tu che le vanità è stato un momento di grande commozione, anch'esso salutato da un applauso trionfale.

Roberto Scandiuzzi, Filippo II, ha cominciato non bene, con qualche muggito e accenti rudi e poco convincenti, ma è rientrato ben presto nei ranghi e ha fatto un Filippo duro e giovanile, di grande presenza vocale e scenica.

Fabio Armiliato ha dato una prova efficiente, forse non molto approfondita dal punto di vista dell'interpretazione (la fragilità nervosa del personaggio latitava) ma vocalmente sicura e teatralmente disinvolta. Armiliato è un cantante affidabile, che non si strozza negli acuti e recita e interpreta sia col corpo che con la voce. Bisogna dargli atto che senza essere un fuoriclasse ha saputo dare a quest'immensa opera un protagonista efficace.

Meno significativo il Posa dell'ormai onnipresente Carlo Guelfi, statico sia fisicamente che vocalmente e con una discutibilissima e fastidiosa propensione a mettere la voce nel naso. Il timbro, poi, è comune e poco si addice al nobilissimo personaggio di Rodrigo. Gli va dato atto di aver eseguito i molti trilli previsti dalla partitura, o almeno di averci provato. La resa del personaggio, pero, era incompleta.

Nel complesso, comunque, si è trattato di una serata memorabile, nel corso della quale l'immenso affresco verdiano ha ricevuto una realizzazione fra le migliori oggi possibili.

Riccardo Domenichini

Don Carlo will be broadcast by Radio 3 on 16 December at 1800 GMT. Click here for details.

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):