Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



Plumbago_9780993198359_1.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Performances

Porgy and Bess at Dutch National Opera – Exhilarating and Moving

Thanks to the phenomenon of international co-productions, Dutch National Opera’s first-ever Porgy and Bess is an energizing, heart-stirring show with a wow-factor cast. Last year in London, co-producer English National Opera hosted it to glowing reviews. Its third parent, the Metropolitan Opera in New York, will present it at a later date. In the meantime, in Amsterdam the singers are the crowing glory in George Gershwin’s 1935 masterpiece.

Il trovatore at Seattle Opera

After a series of productions somehow skewed, perverse, and/or pallid, the first Seattle Opera production of the new year comes like a powerful gust of invigorating fresh air: a show squarely, single-mindedly focused on presenting the work of art at hand as vividly and idiomatically as possible.

Opera as Life: Stefan Herheim's The Queen of Spades at Covent Garden

‘I pitied Hermann so much that I suddenly began weeping copiously … [it] turned into a mild fit of hysteria of the most pleasant kind.’

Venus Unwrapped launches at Kings Place, with ‘Barbara Strozzi: Star of Venice’

‘Playing music is for a woman a vain and frivolous thing. And I would wish you to be the most serious and chaste woman alive. Beyond this, if you do not play well your playing will give you little pleasure and not a little embarrassment. … Therefore, set aside thoughts of this frivolity and work to be humble and good and wise and obedient. Don’t let yourself be carried away by these desires, indeed resist them with a strong will.’

Burying the Dead: Ceruleo offer 'Baroque at the Edge'

“Who are you? And what are you doing in my bedroom?”

'Sound the trumpet': countertenor duets at Wigmore Hall

This programme of seventeenth-century duets, odes and instrumental works was meticulously and finely delivered by countertenors Iestyn Davies and James Hall, with The King’s Consort, but despite the beauty of the singing and the sensitivity of the playing, somehow it didn’t quite prove as affecting as I had anticipated.

Brenda Rae's superb debut at Wigmore Hall

My last visit of the year to Wigmore Hall also proved to be one of the best of 2018. American soprano Brenda Rae has been lauded for her superb performances in the lyric coloratura repertory, in the US and in Europe, and her interpretation of the title role in ENO’s 2016 production of Berg’s Lulu had the UK critics reaching for their superlatives.

POP Bohème: Melodic, Manic, Misbehaving Hipsters

Pacific Opera Project is in its fourth annual, sold out run of Puccini’s La bohème: AKA 'The Hipsters', and it may seem at first blush that nothing succeeds like success.

Edward Gardner conducts Berlioz's L’Enfance du Christ

L’Enfance du Christ is not an Advent work, but since most of this country’s musical institutions shut down over Christmas, Advent is probably the only chance we shall have to hear it - and even then, only on occasion. But then Messiah is a Lenten work, and yet …

Fantasia on Christmas Carols: Sonoro at Kings Place

The initial appeal of this festive programme by the chamber choir, Sonoro, was the array of unfamiliar names nestled alongside titles of familiar favourites from the carol repertoire.

Dickens in Deptford: Thea Musgrave's A Christmas Carol

Both Venus and the hearth-fire were blazing at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance during this staging of Thea Musgrave’s 1979 opera, A Christmas Carol, an adaptation by the composer of Charles Dickens’ novel of greed, love and redemption.

There is no rose: Gesualdo Six at St John's Smith Square

This concert of Christmas music at St John’s Smith Square confirmed that not only are the Gesualdo Six and their director Owain Park fine and thoughtful musicians, but that they can skilfully shape a musical narrative.

Temple Winter Festival: The Tallis Scholars

Hodie Christus natus est. Today, Christ is born! A miracle: and one which has inspired many a composer to produce their own musical ‘miracle’: choral exultation which seems, like Christ himself, to be a gift to mankind, straight from the divine.

A new Hänsel und Gretel at the Royal Opera House

Fairy-tales work on multiple levels, they tell delightful yet moral stories, but they also enable us to examine deeper issues. With its approachably singable melodies, Engelbert Humperdinck's Märchenoper Hänsel und Gretel functions in a similar way; you can take away the simple delight of the score, but Humperdinck's discreetly Wagnerian treatment of his musical material allows for a variety of more complex interpretations.

Rouvali and the Philharmonia in Richard Strauss

It so rarely happens that the final concert you are due to review of any year ends up being one of the finest of all. Santtu-Matias Rouvali’s all Richard Strauss programme with the Philharmonia Orchestra, however, was often quite remarkable - one might quibble that parts of it were somewhat controversial, and that he even lived a little dangerously, but the impact was never less than imaginative and vivid. This was a distinctly young man’s view of Strauss - and all the better for that.

‘The Swingling Sixties’: Stravinsky and Berio

Were there any justice in this fallen world, serial Stravinsky – not to mention Webern – would be played on every street corner, or at least in every concert hall. Come the revolution, perhaps.

The Pity of War: Ian Bostridge and Antonio Pappano at the Barbican Hall

During the past four years, there have been many musical and artistic centenary commemorations of the terrible human tragedies, inhumanities and utter madness of the First World War, but there can have been few that have evoked the turbulence and trauma of war - both past and present, in the abstract and in the particular - with such terrifying emotional intensity as this recital by Ian Bostridge and Antonio Pappano at the Barbican Hall.

First revival of Barrie Kosky's Carmen at the ROH

Charles Gounod famously said that if you took the Spanish airs out of Carmen “there remains nothing to Bizet’s credit but the sauce that masks the fish”.

Stanford's The Travelling Companion: a compelling production by New Sussex Opera

The first performance of Charles Villiers Stanford’s ninth and final opera The Travelling Companion was given by an enthusiastic troupe of Liverpudlian amateurs at the David Lewis Theatre - Liverpool’s ‘Old Vic’ - in April 1925, nine years after it was completed, eight after it won a Carnegie Award, and one year after the composer’s death.

Russian romances at Wigmore Hall

The songs of Tchaikovsky and Rachmaninov lie at the heart of the Romantic Russian art song repertoire, but in this duo recital at Wigmore Hall it was the songs of Nikolay Medtner - three of which were framed by sequences by the great Russian masters - which proved most compelling and intriguing.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Performances

12 Dec 2004

Don Carlo a Firenze

Firenze, teatro Comunale. Si rappresenta il Don Carlo nell'edizione in cinque atti, con la ricostruzione dello storico allestimento di Luchino Visconti. A metà del secondo atto il sipario si chiude per il cambio di scena. Mezze luci in sala, Zubin...

Firenze, teatro Comunale. Si rappresenta il Don Carlo nell'edizione in cinque atti, con la ricostruzione dello storico allestimento di Luchino Visconti. A metà del secondo atto il sipario si chiude per il cambio di scena. Mezze luci in sala, Zubin Mehta non abbandona il podio. Il sommesso scambio di chiacchiere in platea e nelle due gallerie si smorza all'improvviso quando un signore con un microfono in mano esce al proscenio e legge un comunicato che grosso modo dice: il teatro fiorentino censura con forza i tagli ai finanziamenti decisi dal governo e, piu in generale, la sempre minor considerazione che ricevono oggi la cultura e soprattutto il teatro d'opera. Ricorda che il teatro stesso è una casa che dà lavoro a centinaia di persone, le quali hanno deciso di rivelarsi al pubblico non con uno sciopero ma mostrando almeno una parte del lavoro che sta "dietro" lo spettacolo che sta andando in scena.

Il sipario si riapre e il cambio avviene a scena aperta. In pochi minuti decine di macchinisti demoliscono la gigantesca tomba di Carlo V nella chiesa di San Giusto e costruiscono al suo posto l'incredibile prospettiva del chiostro, dove Eboli dovrà intrattenere le dame della corte. E mentre giganteschi pilastri gotici si scoprono dipinti su tela e salgono al cielo, mentre calano le arcate del portico e i cipressi che si alzano nel fondo, mentre l'enorme cancellata d'oro che circondava la tomba viene assicurata a funi e fatta letteralmente volar via, scrosciano gli applausi di un pubblico stupefatto e solidale.

Questa imprevista divagazione nella rappresentazione è stata, al di là del suo significato primo e politico, una vera lezione di teatro, un momento che gli spettatori in sala ricorderanno per molto tempo. E, per di piu, incastonato in uno spettacolo straordinario.

Il Comunale di Firenze ha deciso di rappresentare, a giorni alterni e con due cast diversi, la versione in cinque atti e quella in quattro. Come al solito, quando si decide di rappresentare il Don Carlo si finisce sempre per combinare qualche pasticcio col testo utilizzato: evidentemente non basta decidere per una delle diverse versioni disponibili, da quella di Parigi, ovviamente in francese, in cinque atti e col ballo ma con brani eliminati da Verdi dopo la prova generale per accorciare la durata dello spettacolo, a quelle italiane: Bologna 1867, cinque atti col ballo, semplice traduzione in italiano della versione francese; Milano 1884, ridotta a quattro atti; Modena 1886, riportata a cinque atti ma senza ballo. Nel mezzo, altre modifiche apportate in occasione di una ripresa napoletana. Quella rappresentata a Firenze assieme alla versione di Milano (alla quale pero, se ho capito bene, è stata tagliata l'aria del tenore nel primo atto) è stata nella sostanza la versione di Modena ma con l'aggiunta, come si era fatto alla Fenice nel 1973 e alla Scala nel '77, di due dei brani che Verdi aveva tagliato, solo per ragioni pratiche, prima della prima rappresentazione assoluta: il coro di apertura nel bosco di Fointanbleau e il grande concertato in morte di Posa. Brano a cui Verdi teneva evidentemente molto, visto che tolto dal Don Carlos divenne poi il Lacrymosa della Messa di Requiem. Queste contaminazioni fra versioni diverse mi lasciano sempre perplesso. Non sarebbe piu semplice e corretto decidere per una delle possibili versioni autentiche ed eseguirla sic et simpliciter? E, meglio ancora, non sarebbe ora che qualcuno si decidesse a mettere in scena il primo Don Carlos, quello che ando in scena una volta sola alla prova generale dell'opera?

Quante cose si capiscono vedendo, pur con tutte le sue inevitabili approssimazioni rispetto all'originale, questa ricostruzione di uno dei piu celebri allestimenti di Luchino Visconti! Intanto chi non ha l'età per averne fatto esperienza diretta si trova davanti all'immagine evidente di come si faceva spettacolo d'opera fino agli anni Sessanta, e con essa coglie la vera essenza del grande repertorio italiano, il suo essere manifestazione di una cultura popolare che nella grande mogeneizzazione/americanizzazione/standardizzazione di oggi non esiste piu.

Non è facile, adesso, abbandonarsi con atteggiamento "vergine" a queste scene dipinte, a questa assenza di sovrastrutture intellettualistiche, a questo gusto per l'oleografia, a questo modo di fare regia che ha soprattutto due obiettivi che i registi di oggi nemmeno prendono in considerazione. Il primo: concepire movimenti che rispettino le indicazioni del libretto e i suggerimenti dello spartito e raccontino la storia nella maniera il piu possibile chiara e coinvolgente. Il secondo: cogliere le potenzialità spettacolari del libretto e con lui (e non contro di lui o nonostante lui) costruire, per successive aggiunte, quei tableaux vivants che sono una delle caratteristiche drammaturgiche imprescindibili del grand-opéra. Nello spettacolo di Visconti i quadri finali della scena dell'autodafè e del carcere toglievano il respiro tanto erano belli. E realizzati grazie all'ammirevole padronanza della tecnica registica vera, quella che sa muovere e comporre le masse, che sa recuperare i riferimenti figurativi appropriati, che sa cogliere nel testo i suggerimenti per il proprio contributo senza la patetica pretesa di sovrapporre ad esso drammaturgie alternative spesso inconsistenti.

La realizzazione musicale è stata complessivamente di altissimo livello. Non posso purtroppo andare oltre un giudizio genericamente positivo sulla direzione di Zubin Mehta, poiché credo che la mia collocazione nella sala, proprio sopra la banda degli ottoni e le percussioni, abbia falsato parecchio la mia percezione del contributo orchestrale. Immagino che chi stava in posti meno infelici da questo punto di vista abbia sentito un'orchestra molto piu equilibrata di quanto non abbia sentito io.

Al vertice del cast la Eboli di Violeta Urmana e la Elisabetta di Barbara Frittoli. La prima ha un timbro sfarzoso di mezzosoprano unito a una incredibile facilità nel registro acuto che le ha guadagnato vere e proprie ovazioni dopo un trascinante finale di O don fatale. Barbara Frittoli ha una presenza vocale obiettivamente meno consistente, sia per volume che per bellezza del colore. Il personaggio, poi, deve attendere il quinto atto per giocare la sua grande carta. Ma la sua è stata un'Elisabetta giovane, bellissima, piagata e vocalmente impeccabile. Tu che le vanità è stato un momento di grande commozione, anch'esso salutato da un applauso trionfale.

Roberto Scandiuzzi, Filippo II, ha cominciato non bene, con qualche muggito e accenti rudi e poco convincenti, ma è rientrato ben presto nei ranghi e ha fatto un Filippo duro e giovanile, di grande presenza vocale e scenica.

Fabio Armiliato ha dato una prova efficiente, forse non molto approfondita dal punto di vista dell'interpretazione (la fragilità nervosa del personaggio latitava) ma vocalmente sicura e teatralmente disinvolta. Armiliato è un cantante affidabile, che non si strozza negli acuti e recita e interpreta sia col corpo che con la voce. Bisogna dargli atto che senza essere un fuoriclasse ha saputo dare a quest'immensa opera un protagonista efficace.

Meno significativo il Posa dell'ormai onnipresente Carlo Guelfi, statico sia fisicamente che vocalmente e con una discutibilissima e fastidiosa propensione a mettere la voce nel naso. Il timbro, poi, è comune e poco si addice al nobilissimo personaggio di Rodrigo. Gli va dato atto di aver eseguito i molti trilli previsti dalla partitura, o almeno di averci provato. La resa del personaggio, pero, era incompleta.

Nel complesso, comunque, si è trattato di una serata memorabile, nel corso della quale l'immenso affresco verdiano ha ricevuto una realizzazione fra le migliori oggi possibili.

Riccardo Domenichini

Don Carlo will be broadcast by Radio 3 on 16 December at 1800 GMT. Click here for details.

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):