Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780393088953.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Performances

Of Animals and Insects: a musical menagerie at Wigmore Hall

Wigmore Hall was transformed into a musical menagerie earlier this week, when bass-baritone Ashley Riches, a Radio 3 New Generation Artist, and pianist Joseph Middleton took us on a pan-European lunchtime stroll through a gallery of birds and beasts, blooms and bugs.

Hugo Wolf, Italienisches Liederbuch

Nationality is a complicated thing at the best of times. (At the worst of times: well, none of us needs reminding about that.) What, if anything, might it mean for Hugo Wolf’s Italian Songbook? Almost whatever you want it to mean, or not to mean.

San Jose’s Dutchman Treat

At my advanced age, I have now experienced ten different productions of Wagner’s The Flying Dutchman in my opera-going lifetime, but Opera San Jose’s just might be the finest.

Mortal Voices: the Academy of Ancient Music at Milton Court

The relationship between music and money is long-standing, complex and inextricable. In the Baroque era it was symbiotically advantageous.

I Puritani at Lyric Opera of Chicago

What better evocation of bel canto than an opera which uses the power of song to dispel madness and to reunite the heroine with her banished fiancé? Such is the final premise of Vincenzo Bellini’s I puritani, currently in performance at Lyric Opera of Chicago.

Iolanthe: English National Opera

The current government’s unfathomable handling of the Brexit negotiations might tempt one to conclude that the entire Conservative Party are living in the land of the fairies. In Gilbert & Sullivan’s 1882 operetta Iolanthe, the arcane and Arcadia really do conflate, and Cal McCrystal’s new production for English National Opera relishes this topsy-turvy world where peris consort with peri-wigs.

Il barbiere di Siviglia in Marseille

Any Laurent Pelly production is news, any role undertaken by soprano Stephanie d’Oustrac is news. Here’s the news from Marseille.

Riveting Maria de San Diego

As part of its continuing, adventurous “Detour” series, San Diego Opera mounted a deliciously moody, proudly pulsating, wholly evocative presentation of Astor Piazzolla’s “nuevo tango” opera, Maria de Buenos Aires.

La Walkyrie in Toulouse

The Nicolas Joel 1999 production of Die Walküre seen just now in Toulouse well upholds the Airbus city’s fame as Bayreuth-su-Garonne (the river that passes through this quite beautiful, rich city).

Barrie Kosky's Carmen at Covent Garden

Carmen is dead. Long live Carmen. In a sense, both Bizet’s opera and his gypsy diva have been ‘done to death’, but in this new production at the ROH (first seen at Frankfurt in 2016) Barrie Kosky attempts to find ways to breathe new life into the show and resurrect, quite literally, the eponymous temptress.

Candide at Arizona Opera

On Friday February 2, 2018, Arizona Opera presented Leonard Bernstein’s Candide to honor the 100th anniversary of the composer’s birth. Although all the music was Bernstein’s, the text was written and re-written by numerous authors including Lillian Hellman, Richard Wilbur, Stephen Sondheim, John La Touche, and Dorothy Parker, as well as the composer.

Satyagraha at English National Opera

The second of Philip Glass’s so-called 'profile' operas, Satyagraha is magnificent in ENO’s acclaimed staging, with a largely new cast and conductor bringing something very special to this seminal work.

Mahler Symphony no 8—Harding, Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra

From the Berwaldhallen, Stockholm, a very interesting Mahler Symphony no 8 with Daniel Harding and the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra. The title "Symphony of a Thousand" was dreamed up by promoters trying to sell tickets, creating the myth that quantity matters more than quality. For many listeners, Mahler 8 is still a hard nut to crack, for many reasons, and the myth is part of the problem. Mahler 8 is so original that it defies easy categories.

Wigmore Hall Schubert Birthday—Angelika Kirchschlager

At the Wigmore Hall, Schubert's birthday is always celebrated in style. This year, Angelika Kirchschlager and Julius Drake, much loved Wigmore Hall audience favourites, did the honours, with a recital marking the climax of the two-year-long Complete Schubert Songs Series. The programme began with a birthday song, Namenstaglied, and ended with a farewell, Abschied von der Erde. Along the way, a traverse through some of Schubert's finest moments, highlighting different aspects of his song output : Schubert's life, in miniature.

Ilker Arcayürek at Wigmore Hall

The first thing that struck me in this Wigmore Hall recital was the palpable sincerity of Ilker Arcayürek’s artistry. Sincerity is not everything, of course; what we think of as such may even be carefully constructed artifice, although not, I think, here.

Lisette Oropesa sings at Tucson Desert Song Festival

On January 30, 2018, Arizona Opera and the Tucson Desert Song Festival presented a recital by lyric soprano Lisette Oropesa in the University of Arizona’s Holsclaw Hall. Looking like a high fashion model in her silver trimmed midnight-blue gown, the singer and pianist Michael Borowitz began their program with Pablo Luna’s Zarzuela aria, “De España Vengo.” (“I come from Spain”).

Schubert songs, part-songs and fragments: three young singers at the Wigmore Hall

Youth met experience for this penultimate instalment of the Wigmore Hall’s Schubert: The Complete Songs series, and the results were harmonious and happy. British soprano Harriet Burns, German tenor Ferdinand Keller and American baritone Harrison Hintzsche were supportively partnered by lieder ‘old-hand’, Graham Johnson, and we heard some well-known and less familiar songs in this warmly appreciated early-afternoon recital.

Brent Opera: Nabucco

Brent Opera’s Nabucco was a triumph in that it worked as a piece of music theatre against some odds, and was a good evening out.

LPO: Das Rheingold

It is, of course, quite an achievement in itself for a symphony orchestra to perform Das Rheingold or indeed any of the Ring dramas. It does not happen very often, not nearly so often as it should; for given Wagner’s crucial musico-historical position, this is music that should stand at the very centre of their repertoires – just as Beethoven should at the centre of opera orchestras’.

William Tell in Palermo

This was the infamous production that was booed to extinction at Covent Garden. Palermo’s Teatro Massimo now owns the production.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Performances

12 Dec 2004

Don Carlo a Firenze

Firenze, teatro Comunale. Si rappresenta il Don Carlo nell'edizione in cinque atti, con la ricostruzione dello storico allestimento di Luchino Visconti. A metà del secondo atto il sipario si chiude per il cambio di scena. Mezze luci in sala, Zubin...

Firenze, teatro Comunale. Si rappresenta il Don Carlo nell'edizione in cinque atti, con la ricostruzione dello storico allestimento di Luchino Visconti. A metà del secondo atto il sipario si chiude per il cambio di scena. Mezze luci in sala, Zubin Mehta non abbandona il podio. Il sommesso scambio di chiacchiere in platea e nelle due gallerie si smorza all'improvviso quando un signore con un microfono in mano esce al proscenio e legge un comunicato che grosso modo dice: il teatro fiorentino censura con forza i tagli ai finanziamenti decisi dal governo e, piu in generale, la sempre minor considerazione che ricevono oggi la cultura e soprattutto il teatro d'opera. Ricorda che il teatro stesso è una casa che dà lavoro a centinaia di persone, le quali hanno deciso di rivelarsi al pubblico non con uno sciopero ma mostrando almeno una parte del lavoro che sta "dietro" lo spettacolo che sta andando in scena.

Il sipario si riapre e il cambio avviene a scena aperta. In pochi minuti decine di macchinisti demoliscono la gigantesca tomba di Carlo V nella chiesa di San Giusto e costruiscono al suo posto l'incredibile prospettiva del chiostro, dove Eboli dovrà intrattenere le dame della corte. E mentre giganteschi pilastri gotici si scoprono dipinti su tela e salgono al cielo, mentre calano le arcate del portico e i cipressi che si alzano nel fondo, mentre l'enorme cancellata d'oro che circondava la tomba viene assicurata a funi e fatta letteralmente volar via, scrosciano gli applausi di un pubblico stupefatto e solidale.

Questa imprevista divagazione nella rappresentazione è stata, al di là del suo significato primo e politico, una vera lezione di teatro, un momento che gli spettatori in sala ricorderanno per molto tempo. E, per di piu, incastonato in uno spettacolo straordinario.

Il Comunale di Firenze ha deciso di rappresentare, a giorni alterni e con due cast diversi, la versione in cinque atti e quella in quattro. Come al solito, quando si decide di rappresentare il Don Carlo si finisce sempre per combinare qualche pasticcio col testo utilizzato: evidentemente non basta decidere per una delle diverse versioni disponibili, da quella di Parigi, ovviamente in francese, in cinque atti e col ballo ma con brani eliminati da Verdi dopo la prova generale per accorciare la durata dello spettacolo, a quelle italiane: Bologna 1867, cinque atti col ballo, semplice traduzione in italiano della versione francese; Milano 1884, ridotta a quattro atti; Modena 1886, riportata a cinque atti ma senza ballo. Nel mezzo, altre modifiche apportate in occasione di una ripresa napoletana. Quella rappresentata a Firenze assieme alla versione di Milano (alla quale pero, se ho capito bene, è stata tagliata l'aria del tenore nel primo atto) è stata nella sostanza la versione di Modena ma con l'aggiunta, come si era fatto alla Fenice nel 1973 e alla Scala nel '77, di due dei brani che Verdi aveva tagliato, solo per ragioni pratiche, prima della prima rappresentazione assoluta: il coro di apertura nel bosco di Fointanbleau e il grande concertato in morte di Posa. Brano a cui Verdi teneva evidentemente molto, visto che tolto dal Don Carlos divenne poi il Lacrymosa della Messa di Requiem. Queste contaminazioni fra versioni diverse mi lasciano sempre perplesso. Non sarebbe piu semplice e corretto decidere per una delle possibili versioni autentiche ed eseguirla sic et simpliciter? E, meglio ancora, non sarebbe ora che qualcuno si decidesse a mettere in scena il primo Don Carlos, quello che ando in scena una volta sola alla prova generale dell'opera?

Quante cose si capiscono vedendo, pur con tutte le sue inevitabili approssimazioni rispetto all'originale, questa ricostruzione di uno dei piu celebri allestimenti di Luchino Visconti! Intanto chi non ha l'età per averne fatto esperienza diretta si trova davanti all'immagine evidente di come si faceva spettacolo d'opera fino agli anni Sessanta, e con essa coglie la vera essenza del grande repertorio italiano, il suo essere manifestazione di una cultura popolare che nella grande mogeneizzazione/americanizzazione/standardizzazione di oggi non esiste piu.

Non è facile, adesso, abbandonarsi con atteggiamento "vergine" a queste scene dipinte, a questa assenza di sovrastrutture intellettualistiche, a questo gusto per l'oleografia, a questo modo di fare regia che ha soprattutto due obiettivi che i registi di oggi nemmeno prendono in considerazione. Il primo: concepire movimenti che rispettino le indicazioni del libretto e i suggerimenti dello spartito e raccontino la storia nella maniera il piu possibile chiara e coinvolgente. Il secondo: cogliere le potenzialità spettacolari del libretto e con lui (e non contro di lui o nonostante lui) costruire, per successive aggiunte, quei tableaux vivants che sono una delle caratteristiche drammaturgiche imprescindibili del grand-opéra. Nello spettacolo di Visconti i quadri finali della scena dell'autodafè e del carcere toglievano il respiro tanto erano belli. E realizzati grazie all'ammirevole padronanza della tecnica registica vera, quella che sa muovere e comporre le masse, che sa recuperare i riferimenti figurativi appropriati, che sa cogliere nel testo i suggerimenti per il proprio contributo senza la patetica pretesa di sovrapporre ad esso drammaturgie alternative spesso inconsistenti.

La realizzazione musicale è stata complessivamente di altissimo livello. Non posso purtroppo andare oltre un giudizio genericamente positivo sulla direzione di Zubin Mehta, poiché credo che la mia collocazione nella sala, proprio sopra la banda degli ottoni e le percussioni, abbia falsato parecchio la mia percezione del contributo orchestrale. Immagino che chi stava in posti meno infelici da questo punto di vista abbia sentito un'orchestra molto piu equilibrata di quanto non abbia sentito io.

Al vertice del cast la Eboli di Violeta Urmana e la Elisabetta di Barbara Frittoli. La prima ha un timbro sfarzoso di mezzosoprano unito a una incredibile facilità nel registro acuto che le ha guadagnato vere e proprie ovazioni dopo un trascinante finale di O don fatale. Barbara Frittoli ha una presenza vocale obiettivamente meno consistente, sia per volume che per bellezza del colore. Il personaggio, poi, deve attendere il quinto atto per giocare la sua grande carta. Ma la sua è stata un'Elisabetta giovane, bellissima, piagata e vocalmente impeccabile. Tu che le vanità è stato un momento di grande commozione, anch'esso salutato da un applauso trionfale.

Roberto Scandiuzzi, Filippo II, ha cominciato non bene, con qualche muggito e accenti rudi e poco convincenti, ma è rientrato ben presto nei ranghi e ha fatto un Filippo duro e giovanile, di grande presenza vocale e scenica.

Fabio Armiliato ha dato una prova efficiente, forse non molto approfondita dal punto di vista dell'interpretazione (la fragilità nervosa del personaggio latitava) ma vocalmente sicura e teatralmente disinvolta. Armiliato è un cantante affidabile, che non si strozza negli acuti e recita e interpreta sia col corpo che con la voce. Bisogna dargli atto che senza essere un fuoriclasse ha saputo dare a quest'immensa opera un protagonista efficace.

Meno significativo il Posa dell'ormai onnipresente Carlo Guelfi, statico sia fisicamente che vocalmente e con una discutibilissima e fastidiosa propensione a mettere la voce nel naso. Il timbro, poi, è comune e poco si addice al nobilissimo personaggio di Rodrigo. Gli va dato atto di aver eseguito i molti trilli previsti dalla partitura, o almeno di averci provato. La resa del personaggio, pero, era incompleta.

Nel complesso, comunque, si è trattato di una serata memorabile, nel corso della quale l'immenso affresco verdiano ha ricevuto una realizzazione fra le migliori oggi possibili.

Riccardo Domenichini

Don Carlo will be broadcast by Radio 3 on 16 December at 1800 GMT. Click here for details.

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):