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Performances

16 Dec 2004

Il ritorno di Ulisse in patria a Brescia

Una spiaggia di sabbia, due muri ai lati, l'ingresso monumentale alla reggia di Itaca sul fondo. E' incredibile come questa scena fissa semplicissima sia riuscita a reggere per le tre ore e mezza di spettacolo, ma non solo, a renderlo...

Una spiaggia di sabbia, due muri ai lati, l'ingresso monumentale alla reggia di Itaca sul fondo. E' incredibile come questa scena fissa semplicissima sia riuscita a reggere per le tre ore e mezza di spettacolo, ma non solo, a renderlo comunque vario e godibilissimo.

Sto parlando della messinscena dell'opera di Monteverdi gia' data a Cremona e anche altrove nel circuito dei teatri lombardi, che io ho visto domenica al teatro Grande di Brescia. E' una produzione proveniente da Aix-en-Provence, con le scene e i costumi di Anthony Ward e la regia di Adrian Noble. Per quanto riguarda la parte musicale, Ottavio Dantone dirigeva l'Accademia Bizantina, il coro Costanzo Porta e l'affollatissimo cast. Ma andiamo con ordine.


Accademia Bizantina, Ottavio Dantone, musical director

Come ho detto la scena era seplicissima. Solo, si aggiungevano a quanto ho descritto alcuni fili luminosi che calavano dall'alto e pochi effetti di fumo per le scene "celesti", qualche botola e praticamente niente altro. Eppure lo spettacolo era movimentatissimo: il regista ha chiesto molto ai cantanti in termini di recitazione e tutti hanno risposto molto bene. Capriole, ruote, arrampicamenti sui muri, salti, voli su semplicissime macchine teatrali. Non pensate che l'opera di Monteverdi sia stata trasformata in un circo: la regia e' stata rispettabilissima del libretto e della vicenda e l'unica liberta' che si e' presa, al di la' della vaga atemporalita' dei costumi, e' stato quello di dare all'insieme una colorazione orientale piu' che greca. Col risultato che i tre Proci sembravano piuttosto i Re Magi, ma era un guaio da poco. Il massimo della richiesta registica penso sia stato quello a Roberto Balconi, che fra le altre cose ha interpretato l'Humana Fragilita' nel prologo e che ha sportivamente accettato di cantare per venti minuti buoni completamente nudo, scioccando un po' le signore della pomeridiana domenicale ma nel complesso con un effetto drammatico notevole.

Che poi Balconi abbia la voce che ha... purtroppo e' un altro discorso. Mi sembra la Kabaiwanska dei controtenori, sembra che la voce gli debba essere estratta a forza dalle tonsille. Il cast era dominato da Furio Zanasi che era Ulisse e soprattutto da Sonia Prina che e' stata una Penelope assolutamente strepitosa. Bravissima, lo so che il suo timbro di voce non piace a tutti ma in questo Monteverdi e' stata esemplare per stile, per dizione (non abbiamo perso una sola sillaba del testo) per gusto negli ornamenti. Dieci con lode. C'erano poi, bravissimi, Sergio Foresti (Antinoo), Luca Dordolo (Telemaco) e Roberta Invernizzi (La Fortuna e Minerva). Gli altri erano accettabili su vari livelli, un po' fioca purtroppo la Melanto di Paola Quagliata.

Lo spettacolo sara' riproposto nei prossimi mesi a Ferrara e a Bari: se potete non perdetevelo.

Riccardo Domenichini

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