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Performances

27 Dec 2004

Il trovatore at Munich

Gefahr für die Luftröhre Staatsoper: Neu besetzter "Troubadour" Eine Produktion mit Hustenreiz-Garantie. Denn wenn sich der Vorhang zum hochgradig verstaubten Staatsopern-"Troubadour" öffnet, dann sträuben sich in der Luftröhre die Flimmerhärchen. Für Stars auf der Durchreise taugt das müde Arrangement allemal:...

Gefahr für die Luftröhre
Staatsoper: Neu besetzter "Troubadour"

Eine Produktion mit Hustenreiz-Garantie. Denn wenn sich der Vorhang zum hochgradig verstaubten Staatsopern-"Troubadour" öffnet, dann sträuben sich in der Luftröhre die Flimmerhärchen. Für Stars auf der Durchreise taugt das müde Arrangement allemal: rechts rein, links ab, dazwischen ausgestreckter Arm oder Colliergriff, und in den enervierenden Umbaupausen werden einfach ein paar Pappmaschee-Felsen verrollt.

Was allerdings Sängern, unbelästigt von Regie, freie Wildbahn eröffnet. Und Münchens vereinigte Fankreise waren gekommen, um vor allem ihn als Manrico zu begutachten: Salvatore Licitra, die Hoffnung im Fach des "Tenore robusto", dem Riccardo Muti einst beim Scala-"Troubadour" das hohe C verbot, weil es nicht von Verdi stammt. Licitra hat es, wie sich herausstellte, allerdings nur nach einer verhalten gesungenen Stretta und ein paar vokalen Irritationen. Unstrittig die Qualitäten von Licitras attraktiver, substanzreicher Stimme. Für die Heldenattacke fehlte ihm indes - an diesem Abend - der metallische Kern, Dramatisches wirkte forciert, manch Intervall in höhere Regionen wie ein Sprung ohne Netz. Nach dem Stretta-Hit schien der Star wie erholt - also doch alles Nervensache?

überhaupt war die Aufführung der Beweis, wie schwer derzeit Verdi zu besetzen ist. Auch die Leonora von Fiorenza Cedolins bleibt ein Kompromiss: leicht ansprechend die Mezzavoce, auch Verzierungen und hohe Piani; durchdacht und nachvollziehbar ihre Gestaltung. Doch wird die Dynamik hochgeregelt, gerät ihr Sopran ins Klirren. Alexandru Agache blieb als Luna zu harmlos, steuerte Tonhöhen gern von unten an, lieferte weiche, eingedunkelte Neutralität statt prägnante Bariton-Kraft.

Marco Armiliato, für Zubin Mehta eingesprungen, gab am Pult den temperamentvollen Steuermann, konnte indes musikalische Lähmungserscheinung nicht verhindern. Die Aktschlüsse krachten, Lyrismen hingen oft durch. Da hielt man sich doch lieber an die Königin des Abends. Luciana D'Intino (Azucena) gelang grosses Verdi-Format: Der Beweis, dass sich intensiver Ausdruck und vokale Makellosigkeit nicht ausschliessen müssen. Am besten, die Kollegen riskieren hier mal ein Ohr.

Cast information:

Leonora — Fiorenza Cedolins
Inez — Hannah Esther Minutillo
Il Conte di Luna — Alexandru Agache
Azucena — Luciana D'Intino
Manrico — Salvatore Licitra
Ferrando — Maurizio Muraro
Ruiz — Kenneth Roberson
Alter Zigeuner — Rüdiger Trebes

The Bavarian State Orchestra
The Chorus of the Bavarian State Opera
Marco Armiliato, conducting

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