Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780393088953.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Commentary

Written on Skin: the Melos Sinfonia take George Benjamin's opera to St Petersburg

As I approach St Cyprian’s Church in Marylebone, musical sounds which are at once strange and sensuous surf the air. Inside I find seventy or so instrumentalists and singers nestled somewhat crowdedly between the pillars of the nave, rehearsing George Benjamin’s much praised 2012 opera, Written on Skin.

Bampton Classical Opera Young Singers’ Competition 2017

Bampton Classical Opera’s third Young Singers’ Competition takes place this autumn, culminating in a public final at Holywell Music Room, Oxford on November 19. This biennial competition was first launched in 2013 to celebrate the company’s 20th birthday, and is aimed at identifying the finest emerging young opera singers currently working in the UK.

Peter Kellner announced as winner of 2018 Wigmore Hall/Independent Opera Voice Fellowship

Independent Opera (IO) was very present at the Wigmore Hall last week. On Thursday 5 October, IO announced 26 year old Slovakian bass Peter Kellner as the winner of the 2018 Wigmore Hall/IO Voice Fellowship, a two-year award of £10,000 plus professional mentoring from IO and the Wigmore Hall. A graduate of the Konzervatórium Košice Timonova and the Mozarteum University Salzburg, Peter is currently a member of Oper Graz in Austria where later this season he will sing the title role of Mozart’s Le nozze di Figaro and Colline in Puccini’s La bohème.

‘Never was such advertisement for a film!’: Thomas Kemp and the OAE present a film of Strauss's Der Rosenkavalier at the Oxford Lieder Festival

Richard Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier was premiered at the Dresden Semperoper on 26th January 1911. Almost fifteen years to the day, on 10th January 1926, the theatre hosted another Rosenkavalier ‘premiere’, with the screening of a silent film version of the opera, directed by Robert Wiene - best known for his expressionistic masterpiece The Cabinet of Dr Caligari. The two-act scenario had been devised by Hugo von Hoffmansthal and the screening was accompanied by a symphony orchestra which Strauss himself conducted.

Mark Padmore on festivals, lieder and musical conversations

I have to confess, somewhat sheepishly, at the start of my conversation with Mark Padmore, that I had not previously been aware of the annual music festival held in the small Cotswolds town of Tetbury, which was founded in 2002 and to which Padmore will return later this month to perform a recital of lieder by Schubert and Schumann with pianist Till Fellner.

Natalya Romaniw: 'one of the outstanding sopranos of her generation’

There can hardly be a dry eye in the house, at the ‘Theatre in the Woods’ at West Horsley Place - Grange Park Opera’s new home - when, in Act 3 of Janáček's first mature opera, Natalya Romaniw’s Jenůfa realises that the tiny child whose frozen body has been discovered under the ice is her own dead son.

Elizabeth Llewellyn: Investec Opera Holland Park stages Puccini's La Rondine

It’s six or so years ago since soprano Elizabeth Llewellyn appeared as an exciting and highly acclaimed new voice on the UK operatic stage, with critics praising her ‘ravishing account’ (The Stage) of Mozart’s Countess in Investec Opera Holland Park’s 2011 Le nozze di Figaro in which ‘Porgi, amor’ was a ‘highlight of the evening’.

Dougie Boyd, Artistic Director of Garsington Opera: in conversation

One year ago, tens of millions of Britons voted for isolation rather than for cooperation, but Douglas (Dougie) Boyd, Artistic Director of Garsington Opera, is an energetic one-man counterforce with a dynamic conviction that art and culture are strengthened by participation and collaboration; values which, alongside excellence and a spirit of adventure, have seen Garsington Opera acquire increasing renown and esteem on the international stage during his tenure, since 2012.

A Chat With Italian Conductor Riccardo Frizza

Riccardo Frizza is a young Italian conductor whose performances in Europe and the United States are getting rave reviews. He tells us of his love for the operas of Verdi, Bellini, and particularly Donizetti.

LA Opera’s Young Artist Program Celebrates Tenth Anniversary

On Saturday evening April 1, 2017, Placido Domingo and Los Angeles Opera celebrated their tenth year of training young opera artists in the Domingo-Colburn-Stein Program. From the singing I heard, they definitely have something of which to be proud.

When Performance Gets Political: A Brooklyn Concert Benefiting the ACLU

What’s an artist’s place in politics? That’s the question many were asking after actress Meryl Streep made a pointed speech criticizing President Trump at the Golden Globes. Trump responded directly to Streep, using his preferred communication medium of Twitter to call Streep “overrated.”

Bampton Classical Opera 2017

In 2015, Bampton Classical Opera’s production of Salieri’s La grotta di Trofonio - a UK premiere - received well-deserved accolades: ‘a revelation ... the music is magnificent’ (Seen and Heard International), ‘giddily exciting, propelled by wit, charm and bags of joy’ (The Spectator), ‘lively, inventive ... a joy from start to finish’ (The Oxford Times), ‘They have done Salieri proud’ (The Arts Desk) and ‘an enthusiastic performance of riotously spirited music’ (Opera Britannia) were just some of the superlative compliments festooned by the critical press.

The nature of narropera?

How many singers does it take to make an opera? There are single-role operas - Schönberg’s Erwartung (1924) and Eight Songs for a Mad King by Peter Maxwell Davies (1969) spring immediately to mind - and there are operas that just require a pair of performers, such as Rimsky-Korsakov’s Mozart i Salieri (1897) or The Telephone by Menotti (1947).

Battles administration neglects FLO’s assets by defunding the program

The college administration and President Denise Battles’ recent decision to defund the Finger Lakes Opera came as a shock to many and a concern to more. This decision reflects the administration’s blatant disregard for the arts and reveals a mindset that is counterproductive to the mission of the college.

2017 Summer Festival at Lucerne

Lucerne Festival announces its 2017 Summer Festival.

BEMF Chamber Opera Series Presents Splendors of Versailles

The GRAMMY Award-winning BEMF Chamber Opera Series returns with an all-new production inspired by the splendor and music of the palace of Versailles. King Louis XIV transformed his father’s pastoral hunting lodge at Versailles into a lavish palace that served as the seat of government and culture in France.

Center for Contemporary Opera presents Jane Eyre (World Premiere)

Louis Karchin’s Jane Eyre, a full-length opera in three acts with a libretto by Diane Osen based on Charlotte Bronte’s novel, will receive its world premiere at The Kaye Playhouse (Hunter College) on Thursday, October 20, 7:30pm with a second performance on Saturday, October 22, 8pm. Jane Eyre is Karchin’s second opera, composed in 2014, following his critically acclaimed one-act comic opera Romulus.

Boston Early Music Festival announces the appointment of Melinda Sullivan to the new position of the Lucy Graham Dance Director

Cambridge, MA–The Boston Early Music Festival (BEMF) is pleased to announce the appointment of Melinda Sullivan to the new position of the Lucy Graham Dance Director.

2016 Elizabeth Connell Prize Winner Announced

Kseniia Muslanova from the Russian Federation has won the 3rd annual Elizabeth Connell Prize for aspiring dramatic sopranos held at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music in Sydney Australia on 3 September 2016.

A New Opera Company with a True Story of Forbidden Love

Victory Hall Opera is a new company making its debut in Charlottesville Virginia on August 14, 2016. Its first presentation will be Richard Strauss’s and Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s Der Rosenkavalier.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Commentary

07 Jan 2005

A Lost Portrait of Mozart Recovered?

Musikgenie zwischen Verschwendungssucht und verhärmter Armut — doch aus Mozart-Porträts spricht auch Lebensfreude, Lust am Genuß und tödliche Krankheit. Höchste Zeit, über Amadeus-Legenden nachzudenken. War Mozart dicklich und wohlgenährt? Ein neu aufgetauchtes Bildnis zeigt den Salzburger Meister in seiner späten Zeit, im Jahre 1790. Mozart war 34 Jahre alt und hatte noch gut ein Jahr zu leben. Die Sensation: Pausbäckig und jovial, den Jackenknopf mühsam über dem Bäuchlein geschlossen, bietet Mozart einen Anblick gesunder Lebensfreude und jovialer Genußfähigkeit.

Wonniges Wolferl
Lebenslust und Leiden: Ein Mozart-Bildnis in der Berliner Gemäldegalerie zeigt Mozart gut genährt


Johann Georg Edlinger porträtierte Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wahrscheinlich 1790, wenige Monate vor dessen Tod

Foto: dpa

Von Kai Luehrs-Kaiser

Musikgenie zwischen Verschwendungssucht und verhärmter Armut — doch aus Mozart-Porträts spricht auch Lebensfreude, Lust am Genuss und tödliche Krankheit. Höchste Zeit, über Amadeus-Legenden nachzudenken.

War Mozart dicklich und wohlgenährt? Ein neu aufgetauchtes Bildnis zeigt den Salzburger Meister in seiner späten Zeit, im Jahre 1790. Mozart war 34 Jahre alt und hatte noch gut ein Jahr zu leben. Die Sensation: Pausbäckig und jovial, den Jackenknopf mühsam über dem Bäuchlein geschlossen, bietet Mozart einen Anblick gesunder Lebensfreude und jovialer Genussfähigkeit.

Die Augen lachen, der Mund spitzt sich süffisant zu: Auf dem Bildnis von Johann Georg Edlinger (1741-1819) lacht uns ein Mozart an, der fast den Eindruck erweckt, er habe zu viele Mozart-Kugeln verzehrt. Ist dies der Beginn eines neuen Mozart-Bildes? Greift unsere Vorstellung vom zerrissenen Genie, das zwischen verschwenderischem Hallodri und tragischem Einzelkämpfer oszillierte, doch viel zu kurz? Vor allem aber: Ist denn dies wirklich Mozart?! Oder stellt das in der Berliner Gemäldegalerie beherbergte "Herrenbildnis" eher einen mitteldeutschen Duodez-Fürsten mit dem fatalen Hang zur Süssspeise dar?

Nein, die Forscher sind sich einmal einig: Dieses Mozart-Portrait ist authentisch. Der kurbayrische Hofmaler Johann Georg Edlinger kannte den Wirt des Gasthauses zum "Schwarzen Adler" in der Kauffinger Strasse zu München. Hier kehrte Mozart, der insgesamt siebenmal in München weilte, 1790 letztmalig ein. Dem Maler sass er voraussichtlich im unweit gelegenen Atelier in der Herzogspitalstrasse Modell. Ein Nachfahre des Malers, Wolfgang Seiller, entdeckte vor einigen Jahren in dem 1934 für 650 Reichsmark nach Berlin verkauften Gemälde das Modell seines Ahnen. Und sorgte bei seinem Besuch in Berlin für Staunen bei den Museumsleuten.

Mit Hilfe von Computertechnik und gründlicher Analyse rückten er und der Oberkustos der Berliner Sammlung, Reiner Michaelis, dem Bild näher. Und siehe: dieselbe Sattelnase, dasselbe etwas grössere linke Auge wie auf dem anonymen Mozart-Bildnis im Civico Museo Bibliografico Musicale in Bologna. "Ein überraschend lebendiger Mozart" komme ihm da entgegen, jubelt auch Bernd Lindemann, Chef der Berliner Gemäldegalerie. Sogar für das vitale Aussehen des Komponisten gibt es weiteren Beleg: Eine in Leipzig aufbewahrte Silberstiftzeichnung der Malerin Dora Stock zeigt Mozart ebenso proper wie das Berliner Bild.

Mit Mozarts augenscheinlicher Gemütlichkeit freilich hat es, wie man inzwischen weiss, eine eher betrübliche Bewandtnis. Nach neuesten Forschungen starb Mozart 1791 nicht an der Syphilis oder infolge des Neids von Antonio Salieri. Mozart erlag einem Nierenbluten. Die vorangehende Quecksilberbehandlung sah man ihm schon Monate zuvor an. Sie liess ihn leicht aufgeschwemmt erscheinen. Mozarts vermeintliche Gesundheit ist daher Vorzeichen seines nahen Todes. Und erklärt damit auch die verhältnismässig kleine Zahl existierender Mozart-Bildnisse. Nicht mehr als zehn Mozart-Porträts existieren weltweit. Von Wunderkindesbeinen an war er ein Superstar. Einer grösseren Anzahl von Bildnissen aber entzog er sich einfach durch seinen frühen Tod.

Mit dem Berliner Bild lichten sich somit weiter die Legenden um das tragische Genie. Von Rätseln und vermeintlichen Beweisführungen umstellt, tritt uns erst jetzt hinter der Legende vom verarmten Genie der Mensch mit seinen Fehlern und Unzulänglichkeiten entgegen. Zum Beispiel, was seine Armut anbetrifft. Sie ist nicht, wie man lange Zeit glaubte, auf mangelnde Entlohnung zurückzuführen, sondern einfach darauf, dass Mozart das verdiente Geld mit vollen Händen unverzüglich wieder ausgab. Das zugrunde gerichtete, gar ermordete Genie: ein verbummelter Freigeist. Die Welt lechzt nach Mozart-Legenden. Zum bevorstehenden 250. Geburtstag muss sie sich jetzt ein Paar neue überlegen.

[Click here for remainder of article.]


Mozart-Porträt: G'sund schaut er aus!

VON ANNE-CATHERINE SIMON UND DANIELA TOMASOVSKY
In der Berliner Gemäldegalerie ist ein neues Mozartbild aufgetaucht. Was kann es erzählen?

Wir hatten das Gefühl, dass Mozart durchaus etwas gesünder aussehen darf. Also haben wir das Mozart-Porträt überarbeitet, es ist frischer, farbiger . . ." - so schildert Ingeborg Gasser-Kriss, Marketing-Direktorin für Süsswaren bei der Firma Kraft Foods österreich, den letzten Design-Relaunch der Mirabell Mozartkugeln.

Gesund, jovial und lebensfroh wirkt der Komponist auch auf einem vor kurzem entdeckten, späten Porträt (siehe Bild 1): Blaue, lachende Augen, volle Oberlippen, eine grüne Jacke, die sich über dem Bäuchlein gerade noch schliessen lässt: So könnte Mozart rund ein Jahr vor seinem Tod ausgesehen haben. Rainer Michaelis, Oberkustos der Berliner Gemäldegalerie, ist sich ziemlich sicher, dass auf einem 1790 entstandenen Gemälde des bayrischen Hofmalers Johann Georg Edlinger der 34-jährige Komponist abgebildet ist. "Das Bild hängt seit 70 Jahren als Herrenbildnis bei uns in der Gemäldegalerie. Wolfgang Seiller, ein Nachfahre des Malers, der gleichzeitig Musikliebhaber ist, hat sich Mitte der 1990er-Jahre näher mit dem Bild befasst und eine ähnlichkeit des Porträtierten mit Mozart festgestellt", erzählt Michaelis. "Seiller, der von Beruf Informatiker ist, hat das Bild dann mittels Computer-Analyse mit einem späten Mozart-Bild aus dem Musikmuseum in Bologna verglichen. Und siehe da: Auf dem Edlinger-Bild ist dieselbe Sattelnase und dasselbe etwas grössere linke Auge zu sehen wie auf dem anonymen Mozartbildnis aus dem Civico Museo Bibliografico Musicale." Das 1777 entstandene Gemälde aus Bologna gilt als einziges gesichertes Spät-Porträt des Komponisten.

Für das vitale Aussehen des Komponisten gibt es einen weiteren Beleg: Eine in Leipzig aufbewahrte Silberstiftzeichnung der Malerin Dora Stock zeigt Mozart ebenso wohlgenährt wie das Berliner Bild. Wissenschaftler sehen die Pausbacken allerdings nicht unbedingt als Zeichen für Gesundheit. Nach neuesten Forschungen starb Mozart 1791 nicht an der Syphilis, sondern an einer Nierenblutung. Die vorhergehende Quecksilberbehandlung habe man ihm schon Monate zuvor angesehen. Sie liess ihn leicht aufgeschwemmt erscheinen. Mozarts vermeintliche Gesundheit könnte daher Vorzeichen seines nahen Todes sein. Martin Hohenegger, Pharmakologe am AKH Wien, meint zu dieser Theorie: "Dass Quecksilber für die Pausbacken verantwortlich ist, glaube ich nicht. Aber Mozart wurde als Kind in der Kutsche durch ganz Europa geschleift und hatte oft Infekte. Da ist es sehr wahrscheinlich, dass im Alter die Nieren versagten. Wenn das passiert, ist zu viel Flüssigkeit im Körper, er wirkt aufgeschwemmt."

Auch die historischen Umstände bekräftigen die These, dass auf dem Gemälde Mozart zu sehen ist. Michaelis: "Johann Georg Edlinger kannte den Wirten des Gasthauses zum ,Schwarzen Adler' in der Kauffinger Strasse zu München. Hier kehrte Mozart, der insgesamt siebenmal in München weilte, 1790 letztmalig ein. Der Wirt, Herr Albert, war mehrfach von Edlinger porträtiert worden - und man weiss, dass er Musikliebhaber war."

[Click here for remainder of article.]


Die Tageszeitung ("Taz") reports that the museum knew the portrait was that of Mozart since 1999. Click here for details.

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):