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Recently in Performances

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OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Performances

24 Mar 2005

Parsifal Gets Poor Reception in Berlin

A controversial new production of Wagner’s “punk” Parsifal, by Bernd Eichinger, film-maker and writer of Downfall, provoked outrage when it was premiered in Berlin last Saturday. Here he defends his production. A lot of critics complained that it was staged too close to the orchestra. But that is not a failure – that is exactly what I wanted to do. In a Wagner opera, you have to understand that there are more than 100 musicians; it is a big orchestra, big music. In order that the singers can really be appreciated you have to bring the action forward, closer to the audience. If you put them too far away in the distance of the stage you hear less.


Hanno Müller-Brachmann as Amfortas (Photo: Monika Rittershaus)

Kein Gral weit und breit

Buhkonzert in der Staatsoper: Bernd Eichingers Bühnendebüt "Parsifal" ist müdes Stehtheater

Von Klaus Geitel [Berliner Morgenpost, 21 Mar 05]

Noch nie gab es im Entrée zur Staatsoper ein derartiges Photographengedrängel. Die Kameraleute boxten sich beinahe um die besseren Positionen. Und das alles bei der Premiere des "Parsifal". Es war, als habe unversehens Hollywood die Produktion übernommen. Dabei war doch bloss die Erstlingsregie von Bernd Eichinger in den heiligen Hallen der Oper angesagt.

Click here for remainder of article.


Punk Parsifal provokes outrage in Berlin

Krysia Diver in Stuttgart [The Guardian, 22 Mar 05]

It is one of the world's great opera houses, used to being filled by some of music's finest voices.

But the sound ringing around the Staatsoper in Berlin last weekend was of a different sort.

Click here for remainder of article.


Brust, Bauch, Helm, Speer

Von Eleonore Bünning [FAZ, 21 Mar 05]

21. März 2005 Als "Winterbayreuth" hat sich die Lindenoper in Berlin schon oft verkleidet, nicht erst seit den grossen Kupfer-Barenboim-Wagnerfestivals der neunziger Jahre. An diesem Abend trägt sie den Titel zu Recht. Die neue "Parsifal"-Produktion, die fortan im Spielplan die zwar langweilige, aber regiehandwerklich superkorrekte Inszenierung von Harry Kupfer aus dem Jahr 1992 ersetzen soll, tritt auf wie ein Gegenentwurf zur schrillen Bayreuther "Parsifal"Premiere des vorigen Sommers.

Click here for remainder of article.


They booed? That's great!

[The Guardian, 23 Mar 05]

A controversial new production of Wagner's "punk" Parsifal, by Bernd Eichinger, film-maker and writer of Downfall, provoked outrage when it was premiered in Berlin last Saturday. Here he defends his production.

A lot of critics complained that it was staged too close to the orchestra. But that is not a failure - that is exactly what I wanted to do. In a Wagner opera, you have to understand that there are more than 100 musicians; it is a big orchestra, big music. In order that the singers can really be appreciated you have to bring the action forward, closer to the audience. If you put them too far away in the distance of the stage you hear less.

Click here for remainder of article.


Parsifal, Staatsoper, Berlin

By Shirley Apthorp [Financial Times, 22 Mar 05]

"Can we have your liver?" the Knights of the Holy Grail ask Amfortas. "But I'm using it!" the king protests. To no avail. Resigned, he reaches into his torso and produces a palpitating organ. Just in time for Mass!

Click here for remainder of article.

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