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Performances

03 Mar 2005

Villazón at the Wiener Staatsoper

Er ist ein Bühnenmensch. Durch und durch. Schon ein Interview mit ihm ist eine äußerst unterhaltsame Dar bietung: witzig, inspiriert und sprühend lebendig. “Ich wollte immer alles darstellen,” sprudelt es aus dem 33-jährigen Mexikaner hervor. Mit Kindereien hat er sich dabei nicht aufgehalten. Bereits mit elf Jahren gehörte sein literarisches Interesse Camus und Kafka. “Die Figuren aus den Romanen waren für mich real, ich wollte so sein wie sie.” Das hat er bisweilen im Extrem ausgelebt. Die Biografie Gandhis hat den Jugendlichen später so fasziniert, dass er mit runder Brille und Glatze zur Schule ging. Das überbordende Ausdrucksbedürfnis entdeckte auch bald den Gesang. Vorerst unter der Dusche, am liebsten die Songs von “Perhaps Love”, Placido Domingos Cross-over-Album mit dem Popsänger John Denver – beide kann Villazón heute noch köstlich imitieren.


Scene from Roméo et Juliette

Das war Leben!

VON PETRA HAIDERER [Die Presse, 1 Mar 05]

"Bei Gounod das Sinnliche ent- decken, bei Massenet das Spirituelle!" Rolando Villazón, am 1. März erstmals an der Staatsoper, über Oper, Lied und Leben. Ein Interview - oder doch schon eine Vorstellung?

Rolando Villazón singt an der Staatsoper den Romeo

Er ist ein Bühnenmensch. Durch und durch. Schon ein Interview mit ihm ist eine äusserst unterhaltsame Dar bietung: witzig, inspiriert und sprühend lebendig. "Ich wollte immer alles darstellen," sprudelt es aus dem 33-jährigen Mexikaner hervor. Mit Kindereien hat er sich dabei nicht aufgehalten. Bereits mit elf Jahren gehörte sein literarisches Interesse Camus und Kafka. "Die Figuren aus den Romanen waren für mich real, ich wollte so sein wie sie." Das hat er bisweilen im Extrem ausgelebt. Die Biografie Gandhis hat den Jugendlichen später so fasziniert, dass er mit runder Brille und Glatze zur Schule ging. Das überbordende Ausdrucksbedürfnis entdeckte auch bald den Gesang. Vorerst unter der Dusche, am liebsten die Songs von "Perhaps Love", Placido Domingos Cross-over-Album mit dem Popsänger John Denver - beide kann Villazón heute noch köstlich imitieren.

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Juanita Lascarro

Tenoritis am Wiener Ring

VON WALTER WEIDRINGER [Die Presse, 3 Mar 05]

Rolando Villazón ist der unangefochtene, umjubelte Star in Gounods "Roméo et Juliette".

Vergesst die Grippe. Und auch den schwächelnden Teenie-Starlet-Rummel, der im Raimundtheater die aktuelle Nachwuchsausgabe von Ken und Barbie, pardon: Romeo und Julia, umplätschert. Denn die Tenoritis ist ausgebrochen im Haus am Ring. Mit gutem Grund: Rolando Villazóns Debüt stellte sogar Patrick Woodroffes Lichtarchitektur in den Schatten, die Gounods Shakes-peare-Vertonung zum 24. Mal erhellte. Schon jetzt relativ dunkel und samtig timbriert, sprach Villazóns nicht grosser, aber expansionsfähiger Tenor in allen Lagen leicht an, besass sein Vortrag Geschmack, Eleganz und, ja: auch Feuer. Blühte die Höhe vielleicht nicht immer mit letztem Strahl auf, wurde sie doch ganz angstfrei produziert und so selbstverständlich in die Linie eingebunden, dass man sich fragte, warum man sich so oft mit gängigen tenoralen Unsitten zufrieden gibt.

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