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And London Burned: in conversation with Raphaela Papadakis

Raphaela Papadakis seems to like ‘playing with fire’. After her acclaimed performance as the put-upon maid, Anna, in Independent Opera’s production of Šimon Voseček’s Beidermann and the Arsonists at Sadler’s Wells last year, she is currently rehearsing for the premiere this week of And London Burned, a new opera by Matt Rogers which has been commissioned by Temple Music Foundation to commemorate the 350th anniversary of The Great Fire of London.

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07 Nov 2006

Following a Bread-Crumbed Trail From the 1890s

By ANNE MIDGETTE [NY Times, 6 November 2006]

There’s a basic problem with children’s opera: it’s still opera. That is, it may be framed for children, but you still need big voices to get across an orchestra, and you still have to be prepared for opera’s generous scale and time frame. And yet you don’t get the big emotional or intellectual payoffs of a “Traviata” or a “Walküre” because it’s, well, for children.

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