Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780393088953.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Performances

ROH Return to the Roundhouse

Opera transcends time and place. An anonymous letter, printed with the libretto of Monteverdi’s Le nozze d’Enea con Lavinia and written two years before his death, assures the reader that Monteverdi’s music will continue to affect and entrance future generations:

London Schools Symphony Orchestra celebrates Bernstein and Holst anniversaries

One recent survey suggested that in 1981, the average age of a classical concertgoer was 36, whereas now it is 60-plus. So, how pleasing it was to see the Barbican Centre foyers, cafes and the Hall itself crowded with young people, as members of the London Schools Symphony Orchestra prepared to perform with soprano Louise Alder and conductor Sir Richard Armstrong, in a well-balanced programme that culminated with an ‘anniversary’ performance of Holst’s The Planets.

Salome at the Royal Opera House

In De Profundis, his long epistle to ‘Dear Bosie’, Oscar Wilde speaks literally ‘from the depths’, incarcerated in his prison cell in Reading Gaol. As he challenges the young lover who has betrayed him and excoriates Society for its wrong and unjust laws, Wilde also subjects his own aesthetic ethos to some hard questioning, re-evaluating a life lived in avowal of the amorality of luxury and beauty.

In the Beginning ... Time Unwrapped at Kings Place

Epic, innovative and bold, Haydn’s The Creation epitomises the grandeur and spirit of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment.

The Pearl Fishers at Lyric Opera of Chicago

For its recent production of Georges Bizet’s Les pêcheurs de perles Lyric Opera of Chicago assembled an ideal cast of performers who blend well into an imaginative and colorful production.

New Cinderella SRO in San Jose

Alma Deutscher’s Cinderella is most remarkable for one reason and one reason alone: It was composed by a 12-year old girl.

La Cenerentola in Lyon

Like Stendhal when he first saw Rossini’s Cenerentola in Trieste in 1823, I was left stone cold by Rossini’s Cendrillon last night in Lyon. Stendhal complained that in Trieste nothing had been left to the imagination. As well, in Lyon nothing, absolutely nothing was left to the imagination.

Messiah, who?: The Academy of Ancient Music bring old and new voices together

Christmas isn’t Christmas without a Messiah. And, at the Barbican Hall, the Academy of Ancient Music reminded us why … while never letting us settle into complacency.

The Golden Cockerel Bedazzles in Amsterdam

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov’s fairy tale The Golden Cockerel was this holiday season’s ZaterdagMatinee operatic treat at the Concertgebouw. There was real magic to this concert performance, chiefly thanks to Vasily Petrenko’s dazzling conducting and the enchanting soprano Venera Gimadieva.

Mahler Das Lied von der Erde, London - Rattle, O'Neill, Gerhaher

By pairing Mahler Das Lied von der Erde (Simon O'Neill, Christian Gerhaher) with Strauss Metamorphosen, Simon Rattle and the London Symphony Orchestra were making a truly powerful statement. The Barbican performance last night was no ordinary concert. This performance was extraordinary because it carried a message.

David McVicar's Rigoletto returns to the ROH

This was a rather disconcerting performance of David McVicar’s 2001 production of Rigoletto. Not only because of the portentous murkiness with which Paule Constable’s lighting shrouds designer Michael Vale’s ramshackle scaffolding; nor, the fact that stage and pit frequently seemed to be tugging in different directions. But also, because some of the cast seemed rather out of sorts.

Verdi Otello, Bergen - Stuart Skelton, Latonia Moore, Lester Lynch

Verdi Otello livestream from Norway with the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Edward Garner with a superb cast, led by Stuart Skelton, Latonia Moore, and Lester Lynch and a good cast, with four choirs, the Bergen Philharmonic Chorus, the Edvard Grieg Kor, Collegiûm Mûsicûm Kor, the Bergen pikekor and Bergen guttekor (Children’s Choruses) with chorus master Håkon Matti Skrede. The Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra was founded in 1765, just a few years after the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra : Scandinavian musical culture has very strong roots, and is thriving still. Tucked away in the far north, Bergen may be a hidden treasure, but, as this performance proved, it's world class.

Temple Winter Festival: the Gesualdo Six

‘Gaudete, gaudete!’ - Rejoice, rejoice! - was certainly the underlying spirit of this lunchtime concert at Temple Church, part of the 5th Temple Winter Festival. Whether it was vigorous joy or peaceful contemplation, the Gesualdo Six communicate a reassuring and affirmative celebration of Christ’s birth in a concert which fused medieval and modern concerns, illuminating surprising affinities.

Mark Padmore and Mitsuko Uchida at the Wigmore Hall

The journey is always the same, and never the same. As Ian Bostridge remarks, at the end of his prize-winning book Schubert’s Winter Journey: Anatomy of an Obsession, when the wanderer asks Der Leiermann, “Will you play your hurdy-gurdy to my songs?”, in the final song of Winterreise, the ‘crazy but logical procedure would be to go right back to the beginning of the whole cycle and start all over again’.

Turandot in San Francisco

San Francisco Opera wrapped up its 95th fall opera season just now with a bang up Turandot. It has been a season of hopeful hints that this venerable company may regain some of its former luster.

Daniel Michieletto's Cav and Pag returns to Covent Garden

It felt rather decadent to be sitting in an opera house at 12pm. Even more so given the passion-fuelled excesses of Pietro Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana and Ruggero Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci, which might seem rather too sensual and savage for mid-day consumption.

Manitoba Opera: Madama Butterfly

Manitoba Opera opened its 45th season with Puccini’s Madama Butterfly proving that the aching heart as expressed through art knows no racial or cultural divide, with the Italian composer’s self-avowed favourite opera still able to spread its poetic wings across time and space since its Milan premiere in 1904.

Ian Bostridge and Julius Drake celebrate 25 years of music-making

In 1992, concert promoter Heinz Liebrecht introduced pianist Julius Drake to tenor Ian Bostridge and an acclaimed, inspiring musical partnership was born. On Wenlock Edge formed part of their first programme, at Holkham Hall in Norfolk; and, so, in this recital at Middle Temple Hall, celebrating their 25 years of music-making, the duo included Vaughan Williams’ Housman settings for tenor, piano and string quartet alongside works with a seventeenth-century origin or flavour.

Girls of the Golden West in San Francisco

Not many (maybe any) of the new operas presented by San Francisco Opera over the past 10 years would lure me to the War Memorial Opera House a second time around. But for Girls of the Golden West just now I would be there again tomorrow night and the next, and I am eagerly awaiting all future productions.

DiDonato is superb in Semiramide at Covent Garden

It’s taken a while for Rossini’s Semiramide to reach the Covent Garden stage. The last of the operas which Rossini composed for Italian theatres between 1810-1823, Semiramide has had only one outing at the Royal Opera House since 1887, and that was a concert version in 1986.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Performances

Opéra national de Paris logo
24 Oct 2010

Paris: La Saison a Commencé

Paris Opéra’s L’Italiana in Algeri had a lot going for it, including a star mezzo in her local debut, so why was I resistant to its merits?

Maurizio Benini brought admirable control to the musical proceedings, to be sure, and the orchestra responded well once past a rather characterless overture. Allessandro di Stefano’s male choristers were certainly well-tutored, singing cleanly and correctly even in the face of busy staging. Hmmm. Perhaps a smidge too cleanly and correctly. I might have rejoiced in a little spontaneity infused into the proceedings. That said, harpsichordist Denis Dubois was a highly responsive collaborator, and he partnered the soloists in the recitatives quite inventively all night long. It isn´t often that the dialogue imparts more pleasure than the arias. Hmmmm again. What’s up with that exactly?

Well, Viveca Genaux tried her considerable best in this, her first Paris Opera appearance, and that is indeed considerable. Several times in Act I, though, the voice seemed to not want to ‘speak’ and I wondered if she might be indisposed. And her vocal presence seemed curiously --what’s the word? — muted. My question was answered when, before Act Two’s curtain rise, our diva was indeed announced as under the weather. And that is a pity, since you could tell Ms. Genaux likely had more to offer than was on display. Having enjoyed her in Semele at NY City Opera and in I Capuletti in St. Paul, I find her voice just a bit on the dry side for Italian opera, but a terrific match for Handel. Lacking the ballsy baritonal richness of a Horne, or the quirky abandon of a Bartoli, Viveca relies on evenly produced, well-connected phrases; and technically accurate, assured melismas. Alas, it sounds a little better on paper than it came off in the house. What cannot be disputed is that the lady brought a sultry and spunky physicality to the role, with an easy and pliable sexuality that was hard to resist (and arguably the best gams in the business). Given that she inhabited the character so completely, and given that she was perhaps operating on half steam vocally, I will defer final judgment of her Isabella to another occasion.

Lawrence Brownlee was a sweet-voiced Lindoro and his stage comportment is boyishly appealing. But looking cherubic is perhaps not quite enough to lift the hero to an equal footing with the heroine. It just seemed there was not enough at stake challenging their relationship, and we weren’t rooting for them. We did get to bask in Mr. Brownlee’s high-flying, arching phrases, and admire his well-grounded technique. Although light, his pretty tenor was well-deployed and a good match in timbre with his mezzo. He does a little trick of covering the very top notes, but the result is that they are wondrously steady. Marco Vinco was a generally successful Mustafa, if a bit anonymous. There wasn’t anything about his portrayal that seemed highly personal, and in fact could have been interchanged with several other Rossinian buffo roles with no noticeable difference. His orotund voice was enjoyable and secure, although a bit diffuse, occasionally lacking the bite that might have scored more comic points. Jael Azzaretti’s Elvira was on the opposite side of the fence, offering clean, incisive tone but unable to vary it, thereby suffering from a rather ‘one-note’ vocal portrayal.

Alessandro Corbelli was a seasoned Taddeo, and may have even been memorable in more remarkable company and in a better production. His singing was spot-on, varied, and highly engaging. And he has one of the more splendid baritone instruments currently assessing this Fach. Cornelia Oncioiu brought plummy tone to the small part of Zulma and made solid contributions to the ensembles. Vocal honors of the night to my taste went to baritone Riccardo Novaro for his buzzy, ringing take on Haly. His solid, slightly burnished tone rang out well in the house and his acting was pleasingly poised.

In promotional materials hyping this revival of Andrei Serban’s production, one pulled review declared it ‘hilarious.’ An old New Yorker cartoon came to mind depicting a couple in the stoic audience at an SRO performance, in which the wife hissed to her husband: “I imagine it is far more hilarious with a theatre full of laughing people.” The manic hi-jinks in Mr. Serban’s fussy mounting just didn’t land. Oh, there was a guffaw here, a sustained titter there. But the lack of chemistry between the characters sorely handicapped the hilarity, and the frantic antics didn’t compensate.

Worse, they distracted. I cannot recall one aria that was not accompanied by shuffling feet, semaphoring hands, skittering set pieces, or undulating slave girls performing choreography that looked to have been devised by St. Vitus. (In fact the fidgety dances were created by Niky Wolcz). Marina Draghici’s settings were wonderfully colorful and mostly very functional, but her costumes were less successful, especially the male chorus got up as bulbously fat, naked, turbaned eunuchs. The Act Two curtain rise which revealed the men bent over mooning the audience drew a few well-deserved boos.

Okay, to be fair, there were a few good goofs, like the sinking of the massive cut out of a luxury liner upstage, a veritable comic book Lusitania. And having Mustafa mount stairs to a platform to sit and eat the spaghetti, and then to have the platform pulled away leaving him obliviously dangling and chomping away in mid-air was good fun. But alas, with mis-fired timing, lack of inner comic fire, and highly competent vocalism that never quite achieved the required bravura, this Rossini was decidedly a rather tame affair at the Palais Garnier.

Not so the thrilling “Il Trittico” that inhabited the Bastille house, with a career-capping tour de force (and tour de farce) from veteran Juan Pons. At sixty-four, Mr. Pons is at the culmination of a distinguished career that has taken him to virtually all of the world’s stages. On this occasion he was operating at the top of his game. His Michele in Il Tabarro was easily the finest of my experience, characterized by richly grainy, rolling tone in all registers. If the high G’s did not ‘quite’ have all the spin and ping of yore, they were solid, steady, and they filled the house as powerful statements. His acting is unaffected yet supremely affecting, and he scored every dramatic point. As Gianni Schicchi, Juan flat out nailed all the comedy, too, and I found myself laughing aloud at thrice familiar material I thought could never tickle me again. This was Operatic Royalty at work and we willingly worshipped at the throne.

In the tricky role of Giorgietta, Sylvie Valayre was in good enough form, but it has to be said that her lower middle voice does not have quite the oomph to make the most of the part, such as the low-lying duet with Michele. Give her a high passage, though, and Ms. Valayre is your gal, as she can pour out zinging top notes with effortless abandon. Marco Berti as Luigi reveled in his high notes, too, pushing them out into the auditorium with a vibrant squillo that was a real crowd pleaser. I feel there is a bit more to the role than volume, though, and while he modulated his voice conscientiously, there is no doubt that riding the full orchestra with exciting results is his forte (as it were).

Tinca and Talpa are often comprimario turns but not so here as Eric Huchet and Mario Luperi fleshed them out with expertly sung impersonations. Both did similarly fine work in the last third of the night as Gherardo and Simone, respectively. Marta Moretto was an admirable Frugola and a deliciously bitchy Zita. She knows her way around the stage, turning in inspired comic performances without a hint of shtick yet missing nary an opportunity to get a laugh. She husbanded her substantial mezzo resources well although the tone was a bit rough around the edges at times, especially at the break to chest voice. Small matter, since she is a consummate professional and made nary a false move all night. Even the smallest roles were cast from strength: Hyung-Jong Roh’s shining tenor as the Song Seller could persuade anyone to make a purchase; and the Two Lovers were the loverly, honey-toned Anne-Sophie Ducret and Gregorz Staskiewicz.

I have always found Suor Angelica to be all about sublime atmospheric establishment and one terrific aria (okay, okay and a short mid-opera bitch fight). The piece was well-served indeed by an unsurpassable ensemble of female soloists. All from the front ranks, I could single out Marie-Thérèse Keller for her secure, silvery soprano and her beautifully voiced Mistress of the Novices. Ms. Keller also switched gears later to contribute a seething La Ciesca. Barbara Morihien’s creamy instrument also did excellently by La Badessa, and no less so as Schicchi’s more acerbic Nella. If Fiorenza Cossotto passed her mantle to anyone it just may have come to rest on the imperious Luciana D’Intino (La Zia Principessa). But then Ms. D’Intino is no one’s ‘copy.’ Hers is a personal, sizzling, sizable instrument with just a touch of metal in the middle and top, but with the whole Mother Lode in the chest voice. She is a masterful technician, knitting her registers together with near seamless artistry. She has that elusive ‘star quality’ in spades and dominated her short scene as she must. This was a powerhouse of a performance.

But Angelica is nothing if not about creating sympathy for its hapless heroine, and really the whole show rests on her. Happily, Paris Opera enlisted the services of the gifted Tamar Iveri for the title role. It fits her like a second skin, and Ms. Tamari succeeds in creating a well-rounded personality and distinctive character in spite of the handicap of looking just like (about) everyone else on stage. She is possessed of a handsome spinto which is securely deployed, and uncommonly vibrant in the lower range. She also commands a gleaming top and admirably floats the end of the aria, which has brought many a soprano to grief. I am not sure Tamar is widely known outside of Europe but she should be. This is a major Puccinian.

Of the large, superb ensemble in Gianni Schicchi not already mentioned, Ekaterina Syurina made a laudable role debut as Lauretta. If there is a more famous aria than O Mio Babbino Caro I am not sure what it is (a Callas excerpt is in an advert on CNN about every five minutes right now). Ms. Syurina not only makes the piece her own, voicing it lovingly with her pure lyric soprano, but she also soars joyously in the duet passages. Saimir Pirgu was a memorable Rinuccio, equal parts secure, ringing lyric tenor; and dramatic persona slightly ‘prosciutto crudo.’ When he semaphorically addresses the audience directly, which he does on most solo passages, he seems a Pavarotti wannabe who has lost his white hankie. But he is good-looking, charismatic, and sings with stylistic security, so what the heck, just give him the hankie and be done with it. Alain Vernhes was in fine voice as Betto, and Roberto Accurso made the most out of Marco. Yuri Kissin was bit of luxury casting as Maestro Spinelloccio, and young Christian Helmer used his pleasing baritone to good ends as Amantio di Nicolao.

The production was stylized, and somewhat eccentric but grounded in truthful imagery. Tabarro’s ship was tilted a bit cockeyed, almost like an ice breaker with its bow lifted up during heavy going. But it served the story’s purpose well and additional playing spaces were created by a gangplank going up to a quay, and a gate in the railing opening to the stage apron. The textured grays of the color palette conveyed the workaday repetition and entrapment inherent in Giorgietta’s environment. The back wall had an Arp-inspired opening in it that framed the upstage action on the platform. Lighting effects and rear screen projections were well-judged by designer Gianni Mantovanini. There were some abrupt light changes such as the sudden dimming just in time for Luigi’s fatal entrance at the end of Tabarro, or the white-hot spot on Angelica as she departs this life that might have been modulated differently. But Mr. Mantovanini’s overall work was beautifully evocative and contributed greatly to the overall impression.

Suor Angelica was the most non-representational setting of the night, with a massive Virgin Mary (a replica of the statue in the shadow box on the landing) lying face down (dead?) on the stage floor. All the action was brilliantly played out atop and around this defeated religious icon. What volumes this imagery spoke about our poor heroine’s crisis of faith. The choice to use the Principessa confrontation as the only portion played out on the apron was highly effective. Just when we thought we had seen every possible trap door, stair, and entrance used, Angelica’s little son scrambled out from under the Virgin’s splayed arm, and scurried excitedly to join his mother above just as she threatened to rend the giant statue’s veil in torment. A perfectly judged effect.

Gianni Schicchi plays out in a milieu of skewed platforms, all draped in devilish red fabric that is artfully and weightily swagged up right, accenting the over-sized bed-as-bier. The rear platform this time had a mini-elevator that allowed Schicchi a star entrance of sorts as he descended into the scene. While a projection of the Duomo eventually appeared, and while our lovers ended on this platform as a stand-in for the specified rooftop, the first projection looked suitable for Dante’s Inferno, providing a perfect visual subtext for the ‘grieving’ relatives. The benches and raked playing spaces afforded director Luca Ronconi ample opportunity for varied groupings, and the visual environment encouraged meaningful characterization and story-telling. In collaboration with Assistant Director Ugo Tessitore, the staging did not miss a trick.

Indeed, the artistic leadership not only read and understood Puccini’s specific intentions, but — *gasp* — they embraced them! Zut alors! Numbered among the huge payoffs was the chilling finale to Tabarro which followed the stage directions to the letter and trusted that three highly skilled singers could wring every bit of melodrama out of the thundering closing measures. The audience roared approval ( Eurotrash directors please take note). There was a delightful piece of business in Schicchi in which two large candles, one on each side of Buoso’s death bed, were reverently lit ‘in memoriam’ and then, when the non-bequeathals are made evident, very quickly and unceremoniously blown out. Funny stuff. Traffic management was just magnificent in Schicchi with constantly moving principals who were always motivated, always connected, and always in the right place to make their solo moments count (Mr. Pirgu being the prime, but not the only, example). Mr. Ronconi has put on display a veritable Masters Class of meaningful operatic stage direction, one that is traditional yet bursting with freshness and truth. Bravo, Signor!

I would be remiss not to praise the outstanding costumes designed by Silvia Aymonino. From the drab, oppressive work clothes of Tabarro to the crisp white habits of Angelica to the designer mourning clothes on the Florentines, these were character-specific duds that ably supported the characterizations. Since Schicchi was updated in every other way, I did question the choice to put the title role alone in a (gorgeous) 13th Century costume. Not sure what it meant — that things haven’t changed since then? I got used to it but it was a momentary distraction in an otherwise pretty much perfect evening.

And ‘perfection’ is just the word to characterize the playing that Phillipe Jordan elicited from the orchestra. Seldom have I heard such nuanced and sensitive music-making in a Puccini opus, but Maestro coaxed chamber music sensitivity from this fine band. Nowhere was this more evident than in the lustrous account of Suor Angelica with evocative work from the winds (including haunting passages from the bass clarinet) and luminous ensemble from the banks of strings. Not that Monsieur Jordan shied away from the fire and brimstone of, say, Michele’s sinister aria, or the sassiness of the prankish Schicchi motifs. Never have I heard this pit in more responsive form, and credit for that lies in Jordan’s musical leadership. The Maestro and his orchestra received an enthusiastically vociferous, prolonged acknowledgment of their exceptional music-making at evening’s end.

James Sohre


L’Italiana in Algeri

Conductor: Maurizio Benini
Director: Andrei Serban
Set and Costume Design: Marina Draghici
Lighting Design: Andrei Serban and Jacques Giovanangeli
Choreography: Niky Wolcz
Chorus Master: Allessandro di Stefano
Harpsichord: Denis Dubois

Mustafa: Marco Vinco
Elvira: Jael Azzaretti
Zulma: Cornelia Oncioiu
Haly: Riccardo Novaro
Lindoro: Lawrence Brownlee
Isabella: Viveca Genaux
Taddeo: Alessandro Corbelli

Il Trittico

Conductor: Phillipe Jordan
Director: Luca Ronconi
Assistant Director: Ugo Tessitore
Set Design: Margherita Palli
Costume Design: Silvia Aymonino
Lighting Design: Gianni Mantovanini
Chorus Master: Alessandro di Stefano

Il Tabarro

Michele: Juan Pons
Luigi: Marco Berti
Il Tinca: Eric Huchet
Il Talpa: Mario Luperi
Giorgietta: Sylvie Valayre
La Frugola: Marta Moretto
Song Seller: Hyung-Jong Roh
Two Lovers: Anne-Sophie Ducret, Gregorz Staskiewicz

Suor Angelica

Suor Angelica: Tamar Iveri
La Zia Principessa: Luciana D’Intino
La Badessa: Barbara Morihien
La Suor Zelatrice: Louis Callinan
Mistress of the Novices: Marie-Thérèse Keller
Suor Genovieffa: Amel Brahim-Djelloul
Suor Osmina: Claudia Galli
Suor Dolcina: Olivia Doray
Prima Cercatrice: Zoe Nicolaidou
Seconda Cercatrice: Carol Garcia
La Suor Informiera: Cornelia Oncioiu
Una Novizia: ChengxingYuan
Prima conversa: Anne-Sophie Ducret
Seconda conversa: Marina Haller

Gianni Schicchi

Gianni Schicchi: Juan Pons
Lauretta: Ekaterina Syurina
Zita: Marta Moretto
Rinuccio: Saimir Pirgu
Gherardo: Eric Huchet
Nella: Barbara Morihien
Betto: Alain Vernhes
Simone: Mario Luperi
Marco: Roberto Accurso
La Ciesca: Marie-Thérèse Keller
Maestro Spinelloccio: Yuri Kissin
Amantio di Nicolao: Christian Helmer
Pinellino: Ugo Rabec
Guccio: Alexandre Duhamel

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):