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Performances

Matthew Polenzani as Hoffmann and Anna Christy as Olympia [Photo by Dan Rest courtesy of Lyric Opera of Chicago]
09 Nov 2011

Tales of Hoffmann, Chicago

For its first production of the new season, Jacques Offenbach’s Les Contes d’Hoffmann, Lyric Opera of Chicago assembled a distinguished roster of soloists with the Lyric Opera Orchestra under the direction of Emmanuel Villaume.

Jacques Offenbach: Tales of Hoffmann

Click here for cast and other production information.

Above: Matthew Polenzani as Hoffmann and Anna Christy as Olympia

Photos by Dan Rest courtesy of Lyric Opera of Chicago

 

Those characters populating the stage from start to finish include an incarnation of the writer Hoffmann and his Muse, the latter figure appearing also as the confidante Niklausse. Hoffmann’s recurring nemeses, or the villains of individual acts, add of course to the sense of continuity throughout the piece. The lead roles in this production are strongly cast with Matthew Polenzani as Hoffmann, Emily Fons as the Muse/ Niklausse, and James Morris assuming the personae of Hoffmann’s opponents.

Hoffmann_Chicago_2011_04.gifAlyson Cambridge as Giulietta and Matthew Polenzani as Hoffmann

As in comparable productions of Offenbach’s late opera the prologue and first act are performed together. At the start of the prologue in this conception pantomimic gestures show the inebriated Hoffmann being helped from the stage by his Muse, just as Councillor Lindorf assumes his position before a backdrop at the center. Lindorf’s rivalry with Hoffmann is now focused on the diva Stella who currently sings in a local production of Mozart’s Don Giovanni. As Lindorf bribes the diva’s servant to surrender a communication intended for Hoffmann, the Councillor assures that he has the advantage of a devilish spirit with an extended pitch on ”diable.” In opposition to the “poète” Morris concludes his self-declaration with an effectively declaimed “je suis vif.” This scene is effective not only as a motivation for Hoffmann’s relating his amorous adventures but also as a key to the opera’s conclusion when Stella indeed leaves the stage accompanied by Lindorf.

During the remainder of the prologue the scene takes place in Luther’s tavern. The collected male students, portrayed in a large tableau by the Lyric Opera Chorus, are clearly inspired during intermission at the neighboring opera and raise toasts to Stella. Once Hoffmann and Niklausse appear at the tavern, the repartee with the students leads to Hoffmann’s well-known chanson about the dwarf Kleinzach. As Hoffmann describes in his ballad the face of Kleinzach his mind wanders to focus on his love for Stella. In this mixture of musical styles and the subsequent veneration of Stella, Polenzani interspersed a clear sense of legato with lyrical outbursts sung forte (“figure,” “trois âmes dans une seule âme”) and showing exquisite control of pitch. In his final cresting declaration before the close of the prologue Polenzani introduces vocally Hoffmann’s emotional state in preparation for the narratives of the following acts. (“Du bon sens”)

Hoffmann_Chicago_2011_02.gifEmily Fons as Nicklausse and Matthew Polenzani as Hoffmann

In each of these subsequent acts an amorous entanglement leads to hope and disappointment. The female objects of Hoffmann’s infatuation, Olympia, Antonia, and Giulietta, are sung in this production by Anna Christy, Erin Wall, and Alyson Cambridge. As Hoffmann first steals a glance at the mechanical doll Olympia in Act I, Polenzani’s lyrical technique bloomed yet further beyond his singing in the prologue. He sang at times piano with an effective use of diminuendo as he described his devotion to the study of physics primarily as a means to approaching the professor’s daughter Olympia. These lines became even more credible for the persona of Hoffmann as Polenzani’s characterization was delineated with effortless top notes. Before the doll sings her famous aria Niklausse arrives and comments on Hoffmann’s delusion and emotional distraction. Here Ms. Fons sang her first solo piece with lyrical ease and presented an amusing caricature of the doll as she mimicked it both vocally and with her own physically lithe gestures. Hoffmann refuses to heed common sense and listens enraptured to the doll Olympia’s voice. In this role Ms. Christy excelled at combining a bright upper register in her melodic line with skillful coloratura decoration. At the same time she sang in the spirit of the character so that her voice took on the mechanical quality which her body communicated through gestures, as she performed fixed in a rotating movable base. In his response to Olympia’s movements and speech Polenzani depicts Hoffmann lost in his passion while he casts off volleys of lyrical devotion. As Olympia’s identity is finally revealed Polenzani concluded the act together with the chorus in alternating cries of “Un automate” sung forte and with absolute control of pitch.

In Act II the characters Antonia, her father Crespel, and the voice of her deceased mother contribute to Hoffmann’s second involvement. Erin Wall sang a touching rendition of Antonia’s wistful opening romance, “Elle a fui” [“She has flown away”]. Ms. Wall varied her approach so that her softest notes blended fittingly with more dramatic and fully voiced lines. In the role of Crespel bass-baritone Christian Van Horn made a strong impression as Antonia’s protective father. As he implored his weakened child to sing no longer, even the simple phrase “Je t’en prie” [“I beg of you”] was infused by Mr. Van Horn with memorable resonance. When Hoffmann and Niklausse enter on this scene, the servant Frantz — sung her by Rodell Rosel with comic delight — is alone, having just finished a pantominic dance. Hoffmann begs to be admitted to his beloved Antonia’s presence, a meeting which Frantz has been forbidden to allow. In the following series of set pieces the characters reflect on both the role of love and on their own emotions. As one of the highlights of this productions Ms. Fons sang the second aria for Niklausse while she tries to persuade Hoffmann to devote himself to love as art (“Vois sous l’archet frémissant” [“See beneath the quivering bow”]). Fons used her voice with its secure low notes to great effect in expressing the dominant spirit of “l’amour vainqueur,” just as she concluded the aria by drawing on the exciting upper extension of her range. Niklausse makes himself scarce at the reappearance of Antonia who now finally sings together with Hoffmann. In their duet Wall and Polenzani showed refined passagework, their voices moving apart and, again, in unison with emotional commitment. At the entrance of Dr. Miracle, sung by Morris, Crespel expresses great concern for his daughter’s well-being. Ultimately Antonia succumbs to the persuasions of Dr. Miracle and to the voice of her dead mother, sung here with resonance and authority by mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton in her debut at Lyric Opera. When Hoffmann attempts to summon help, his beloved Antonia has already died.

Hoffmann_Chicago_2011_03.gifErin Wall as Antonia and James Morris as Dr Miracle

The final involvement in the protagonist’s series of adventures carries him to Giulietta’s palazzo in Venice. At the start of the final act she and Niklausse sing the famous barcarolle; in this performance both voices were distinctly audible as though both were woven into the melody. The signature bass aria, “Scintille, diamante,” sung by Dapertutto to tempt Giulietta, was sung by Morris with an attentive sense of line. Ms. Cambridge fulfills well the vocal and dramatic challenges of her role, yet at times her use of vibrato can lead to stylization.

In the epilogue to the opera Hoffmann has finished the narration of his tales and is found, inebriated, together with the Muse. Even though Stella from the prologue now appears for the assignation and leaves in the company of a triumphant Lindorf, the audience presumes that Hoffmann will awaken in the confident realm of Poetry.

Salvatore Calomino

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