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Detail from Marriage A-la-Mode: 1. The Marriage Settlement by William Hogarth (1697 - 1764), c. 1743
12 Mar 2006

CIMAROSA: Il Matrimonio Segreto

Il Matrimonio Segreto, Melodramma giocoso in two acts.

Music composed by Domenico Cimarosa (1749-1801). Libretto by Giovanni Bertati after The Clandestine Marriage (1766) by George Colman the Elder and David Garrick.

Domenico Cimarosa: Il Matrimonio Segreto

Carolina: Alda Noni; Elisetta: Ornella Rovero; Fidalma: Giulietta Simionato; Geronimo: Sesto Bruscantini; Paolino: Cesare Valletti; Robinsone: Antonio Cassinelli. Orchester des Maggio Musicale Fiorentino. Manno Wolf-Ferrari, conducting. Recorded 30 July 1950.

 

First Performance: 7 February 1792 at Burgtheater, Vienna.

Principal Characters:

Carolina, Geronimo's daughter Soprano
Elisetta, her sister Mezzo-Soprano
Paolino, young clerk to Geronimo Tenor
Geronimo, a rich merchant Bass
Fidalma, his sister Contralto
Count Robinson Bass

Time and Place: 18th Century Bologna at Geronimo's home

Synopsis:

We are in the household of Geronimo, a wealthy citizen of Bologna; he has two daughters, Elisetta and Carolina, and a sister Fidalma, who runs the household. He also has a young secretary, Paolino, who is secretly married to the younger daughter, Carolina.

Act I

Paolino is working to arrange a marriage contract between Elisetta and his patron, Count Robinson, hoping that as soon as Geronimo's older daughter is well married, his marriage to the younger one will be acceptable. Count Robinson has written a letter expressing interest - tempted by Elisetta's substantial dowry - and Geronimo is thrilled to think that his daughter will be a Countess. Fidalma confesses to her niece that she is in love, too, but only reveals in an aside to the audience that she has her eye on Paolino.

When the Count arrives he is disappointed to find that it is not Carolina who has been offered to him. He tells Paolino that he will be content with a smaller dowry and sends him off to arrange the match. Carolina doesn't dare tell the count that she is married, so when she admits she has no lover it excites him further; she tries to convince him she has no desire or qualification to be a countess, but he continues to pursue her. Elisetta accuses them both of betraying her, and the commotion attracts Fidalma who joins Carolina in trying to calm Elisetta; everyone tries at once to explain his or her feelings to the confused and exasperated Geronimo.

Act II

Geronimo insists that the Count must honor his contract and marry Elisetta, but the Count refuses. When he offers to accept a smaller dowry with Carolina's hand instead, Geronimo is delighted to save face and money - as long as Elisetta agrees.

Paolino is distraught, and throws himself on Fidalma's mercy, but is stunned to find that she hopes to marry him; he faints, giving her the idea that she returns his emotion and making Carolina think she has been betrayed, but he promises that they will leave the house at dawn and take refuge in the house of a relative.

The Count tells Elisetta all his bad habits and physical defects, hoping she'll reject him, but she stands firm - and he finally confesses that he cannot abide her. Geronimo can't persuade her either. Fidalma suggests sending Carolina to a convent, and Geronimo agrees. Carolina is broken-hearted and tries to confess her predicament to the Count, but they are interrupted by her sister, her aunt and her father who are gleeful at having caught them together, and Geronimo sends Paolino off with a letter to the Mother Superior.

After a brilliant and farcical finale Paolino and Carolina finally confess they have been married for two months; Geronimo and Fidalma are furious, but the Count and Elisetta advise them to forgive the newlyweds, adding that they themselves will marry after all.

[Synopsis Source: Opera Theatre of St. Louis]

Click here for the complete libretto.

Click here for large image of Hogarth's Marriage A-la-Mode: 1. The Marriage Settlement (National Gallery)

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