Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780393088953.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Repertoire

La Púrpura de la Rosa

Advertised in the program as the first opera written in the New World, La Púrpura de la Rosa (PR) was premiered in 1701 in Lima (Peru), but more than the historical feat, true or not, accounts for the piece’s interest.

Das Liebesverbot, Vienna 1962

Das Liebesverbot: Grosse komische Oper in two acts.

Lohengrin, Bayreuth 2010 Live

Opera in three acts. Words and music by Richard Wagner.

Parsifal, Bayreuth 2012 Live

Parsifal. Bühnenweihfestspiel (“stage dedication play”) in three acts.

Music from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

“German poet, dramatist and novelist. One of the most important literary and cultural figures of his age, he was recognized during his lifetime for his accomplishments of almost universal breadth. However, it is his literary works that have most consistently sustained his reputation, and that also serve to demonstrate most clearly his many-faceted relationship to music. . . .

Operas based on the works of Friedrich von Schiller

This theme relates to operas based on the works of Friedrich von Schiller.

Operas Based on French Literature

Here are operas based on French literature from Balzac, Hugo and beyond:

Jules Massenet: Le Cid

Le Cid, Opéra in 4 acts

Vincenzo Bellini: I puritani

I puritani, opera seria in three acts

Vincenzo Bellini: Zaira

Zaira, Tragedia lirica in two acts.

G. F. Handel: Athalia

Athalia: Oratorio (sacred drama) in 3 acts

DONIZETTI: Lucrezia Borgia

Lucrezia Borgia: Melodramma in a prologue and two acts.

BERTIN: La Esmeralda

La Esmeralda: Opéra in four acts.

VERDI: Ernani — Florence 1957

Ernani: Dramma lirico in four parts.

von Waltershausen: Oberst Chabert

Oberst Chabert (Colonel Chabert): Tragic opera in 3 acts.

VERDI: Otello — La Scala 1954

Otello: Dramma lirico in four acts.
Music composed by Giuseppe Verdi. Libretto by Arrigo Boito after The Tragedie of Othello, the Moore of Venice by William Shakespeare.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

A Midsummer Night’s Dream, a comedy in five acts with incidental music.

HAHN: Le Marchand de Venise

Le Marchand de Venise (“The Merchant of Venice”): Opéra in three acts.

STORACE: Gli Equivoci

Gli Equivoci (The Comedy of Errors): Opera in two acts.

MARTIN: Der Sturm

Der Sturm: Opera in three acts

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Repertoire

Helen of Troy by Evelyn de Morgan, 1898
07 Sep 2008

STRAUSS: Die ägyptische Helena — Munich 1956

Die ägyptische Helena: Oper in two acts.

Richard Strauss: Die ägyptische Helena [Revised Version]

Helen (Leonie Rysanek), Menelaus (Bernd Aldendorf), Aithra (Annelies Kupper), Altair (Hermann Uhde), Da-ud (Richard Holm), The Omniscient Seashell (Ira Malaniuk). Bayerisches Staatsorchester. Chor der Bayerischen Staatsoper. Joseph Keilberth (cond.)
Live Performance: 10 August 1956, Münchner Opern-Festspiele, Prinzregententheater, Munich.

 

Music composed by Richard Strauss. Libretto by Hugo von Hofmannsthal.

First Performance: 6 June 1928, Sächsisches Staatstheater Opernhaus, Dresden (revised version, Salzburg, Festspielhaus, 14 August 1933).

Principal Roles:
Helena [Helen] of Troy, wife of Menelaus Soprano
Menelas [Menelaus], her husband Tenor
Hermione, their daughter [role omitted in 1933 version] Soprano
Aithra, a sorceress Soprano
Altair, a nomad chieftain Baritone
Da-ud, his son Tenor
The Omniscient Seashell Contralto
Two Servants of Aithra Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano
Three Elves Two Sopranos, Contralto

Setting: Egypt, 1193-1184 B.C. (after the Trojan War)

Synopsis:

In the Egyptian palace of the sorceress Aithra, the omniscient mussel (an all-knowing sea-shell left by Aithra’s lover Poseidon) sights a ship bound for Sparta. On board is the raging Menelaus who is determined to kill Helen for her faithlessness and for causing the death of so many Greeks. A storm is conjured up and the couple are shipwrecked near the palace. Aithra, with the help of some magical lotus juice, convinces Menelaus that Helen of Troy was an illusion of the gods, that the real Helen was faithful, and that they should be sent on a second honeymoon to an oasis beneath the Atlas Mountains. Helen and Menelaus are entertained by a desert sheik and his son, but the foursome find themselves trapped in a symbolic re-enactment of events in Troy that led to the death of Paris. As a result of this tragic psychotherapy Helen realises that thanks to Aithra's potion she will always be living as an impostor. She and Menelaus take a draught of remembrance and embrace the reality of their former love, sealed by the appearance of her daughter Hermione.

[Synopsis Source: Boosey & Hawkes]

Click here for the complete libretto.

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):