Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


facebook-icon.png


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780393088953.png

9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Interviews

Written on Skin: the Melos Sinfonia take George Benjamin's opera to St Petersburg

As I approach St Cyprian’s Church in Marylebone, musical sounds which are at once strange and sensuous surf the air. Inside I find seventy or so instrumentalists and singers nestled somewhat crowdedly between the pillars of the nave, rehearsing George Benjamin’s much praised 2012 opera, Written on Skin.

‘Never was such advertisement for a film!’: Thomas Kemp and the OAE present a film of Strauss's Der Rosenkavalier at the Oxford Lieder Festival

Richard Strauss’s Der Rosenkavalier was premiered at the Dresden Semperoper on 26th January 1911. Almost fifteen years to the day, on 10th January 1926, the theatre hosted another Rosenkavalier ‘premiere’, with the screening of a silent film version of the opera, directed by Robert Wiene - best known for his expressionistic masterpiece The Cabinet of Dr Caligari. The two-act scenario had been devised by Hugo von Hoffmansthal and the screening was accompanied by a symphony orchestra which Strauss himself conducted.

Mark Padmore on festivals, lieder and musical conversations

I have to confess, somewhat sheepishly, at the start of my conversation with Mark Padmore, that I had not previously been aware of the annual music festival held in the small Cotswolds town of Tetbury, which was founded in 2002 and to which Padmore will return later this month to perform a recital of lieder by Schubert and Schumann with pianist Till Fellner.

Natalya Romaniw: 'one of the outstanding sopranos of her generation’

There can hardly be a dry eye in the house, at the ‘Theatre in the Woods’ at West Horsley Place - Grange Park Opera’s new home - when, in Act 3 of Janáček's first mature opera, Natalya Romaniw’s Jenůfa realises that the tiny child whose frozen body has been discovered under the ice is her own dead son.

Elizabeth Llewellyn: Investec Opera Holland Park stages Puccini's La Rondine

It’s six or so years ago since soprano Elizabeth Llewellyn appeared as an exciting and highly acclaimed new voice on the UK operatic stage, with critics praising her ‘ravishing account’ (The Stage) of Mozart’s Countess in Investec Opera Holland Park’s 2011 Le nozze di Figaro in which ‘Porgi, amor’ was a ‘highlight of the evening’.

Dougie Boyd, Artistic Director of Garsington Opera: in conversation

One year ago, tens of millions of Britons voted for isolation rather than for cooperation, but Douglas (Dougie) Boyd, Artistic Director of Garsington Opera, is an energetic one-man counterforce with a dynamic conviction that art and culture are strengthened by participation and collaboration; values which, alongside excellence and a spirit of adventure, have seen Garsington Opera acquire increasing renown and esteem on the international stage during his tenure, since 2012.

A Chat With Italian Conductor Riccardo Frizza

Riccardo Frizza is a young Italian conductor whose performances in Europe and the United States are getting rave reviews. He tells us of his love for the operas of Verdi, Bellini, and particularly Donizetti.

And London Burned: in conversation with Raphaela Papadakis

Raphaela Papadakis seems to like ‘playing with fire’. After her acclaimed performance as the put-upon maid, Anna, in Independent Opera’s production of Šimon Voseček’s Beidermann and the Arsonists at Sadler’s Wells last year, she is currently rehearsing for the premiere this week of And London Burned, a new opera by Matt Rogers which has been commissioned by Temple Music Foundation to commemorate the 350th anniversary of The Great Fire of London.

Oxford Lieder Festival: in conversation with Julius Drake

In October 2014, the Oxford Lieder Festival - under its imaginative and intrepid founder, Sholto Kynoch - fulfilled an incredibly ambitious goal: to perform Schubert’s entire corpus of songs - more than 600 - and, for three marvellous weeks, to bring Vienna to Oxford. ‘The Schubert Project’ was a magnificent celebration of the life and music of Franz Schubert: at its core lay the first complete performance of Schubert’s songs - including variants and alternative versions - in the UK.

Interview with Star of Florencia en el Amazonas, Elizabeth Caballero

Lyric soprano Elizabeth Caballero’s signature role is Violetta in La traviata, which she portrays with a compelling interpretation, focused sound, and elegant coloratura that floats through the opera house as naturally as waves on the ocean.

A Chat With Baritone Brian Mulligan

Maria Nockin interviews baritone Brian Mulligan.

An interview with Tobias Ringborg

I arrive at the Jerwood Space, where rehearsals are underway for Garsington Opera’s forthcoming production of Idomeneo, to find that the afternoon rehearsal has finished a little early.

A Conversation with Sir Nicholas Jackson

With its merry-go-round exchange of deluded and bewitched lovers, an orphan-turned-princess, a usurped prince, a jewel and a flower with magical properties, a march to the scaffold and a meddling ‘mistress-of-ceremonies’ who encourages the young lovers to disguise and deceive, William Makepeace Thackeray’s The Rose and the Ring has all the ingredients of an opera buffa.

A Chat With Up-and-Coming Conductor Kathleen Kelly

Kathleen Kelly is an internationally renowned pianist, coach, conductor, and master teacher. She was the first woman and first American named Director of Musical Studies at the Vienna State Opera.

Atsuto Sawakami — Sponsor of Italian Opera in Japan

Atsuto Sawakami is a slightly built man in his late sixties with impeccable, gentlemanly manners. He communicates a certain restless energy and his piercingly bright eyes reveal an undimmed appetite for life.

Mark Stone — Oxford Lieder Festival

‘Lieder v. Opera’? At first glance it might seem to be a pointless or nonsensical question.

Oxford Lieder Festival 2015 - Sholto Kynoch interview

Last year's Oxford Lieder Festival made something of a splash when it encompassed all of Schubert's songs, performed in the space of three weeks. This year's festival, the 14th, which runs from 16 to 31 October 2015 has a rather different, yet still eye-catching theme; Singing Words: Poets and their Songs.

For Odyssey Opera, No Operatic Challenge is Too Great

For a company founded in 2013, Odyssey Opera has an astounding track record. To take on Korngold’s Die tote Stadt is ambitious enough, but to do so within only a year of the company’s founding seems almost single-minded.

A Chat with Tenor René Barbera

American tenor René Barbera is fast making a name for himself as one of the top bel canto singers in opera houses around the world.

Stefano Mastrangelo — An Italian in Japan

I’m interviewing Stefano Mastrangelo in the immediate aftermath of his conducting La Traviata for the Chofu City Opera in Tokyo on 22 November 2014; he conveys an air at once of tiredness and exhilaration.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Interviews

David Freeman
26 May 2012

Garsington Opera at Wormsley

Director David Freeman tells why this is an event worth experiencing in the Olympic year.

Vivaldi’s L’Olimpiade At Garsington Opera

An Interview by Anne Ozorio

Above: David Freeman

 

Garsington Opera built its reputation on operatic rarities and baroque in particular. David Freeman has directed all three productions of Vivaldi’s operas here, with baroque specialist Laurence Cummings conducting. “We did L’Incoronazione de Dario, from Vivaldi’s early period, La Verità in cimento (see review) last year, and now L’Olimpiade, from much later. This is probably the finest - we’ve saved best for last”. Though, hopefully there will be more Vivaldi at Garsington Opera at Wormsley. “Vivaldi said he wrote around 70 operas, though some may have been pastiches. We don’t have them all, but there are over 20 that can be done”. “Vivaldi was an extraordinary person, with bright red hair. He was a priest and ran his own opera company where he did everything, composer, producer, music director. His orchestra was all-female, which at the time was very unusual, and the stories around him are lurid” says Freeman.

L’Olimpiade is an Oedipus Rex story says Freeman. An athlete called Megacles competes in the Olympics. The prize is the hand of the princess Aristea. Megacles and Aristea love each other but he’s won under the name of Licidas, his friend, who is in turn loved by Argene. When the King hears about the deception, he banishes Licidas, who then is drawn into a plot to assassinate the King. But Licidas turns out to be the king’s own son, supposedly killed at birth because of a prophecy that he’ll grow up to kill his father. In Vivaldi’s version, the plot resolves with the right pairs of lovers reunited, and Licidas becomes prince. “It seems very complicated”, Freeman adds, “until you see it, and then it all makes sense. A bit like Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night”.

Freeman has directed a lot of Shakespeare, including Twelfth Night. Indeed, he’s a complete man of the theatre, with huge and varied experience. He directed Prokofiev The Fiery Angel at the Royal Opera House, the Kirov and San Francisco, the premiere of Sir Harrison Birtwistle’s The Mask of Orpheus, and Philip Glass’s Akhnaten. He was associated with names like Peter Brook, and founded The Opera Factory which was closely associated with The English National Opera in its “powerhouse” days. He’s also directed mainstream spectacles like Madama Butterfly and Carmen at the Royal Albert Hall. He’s worked in film, too, and is directing a multimedia Handel Messiah in Copenhagen next year.

Garsington-Opera-at-Wormsle.gifGarsington Opera at Wormsley [Photo: Richard Davies]

Thus it was an education to watch him direct a rehearsal of L’Olimpiade. They were doing a scene where Aristea (Rosa Bove) learns that she’s to be married to a stranger. Bove is embracing a toy lamb. The King Clistene (Riccardo Novaro) enters and quietly removes the toy sheep. “She has to grow up now and be married” says Freeman. Novaro deposits the lamb behind a rock, out of Bove’s sight. It’s a small gesture, lasting under a minute, but Freeman shows how it expresses the King’s purposeful nature. “Don’t look at the lamb” Freeman tells Novaro. Clistene isn’t interested in sheep but in his daughter and her coming of age.

At Garsington Opera at Wormlsey, real sheep roam the fields, but inside the auditorium, life size models of sheep move across the stage, pulled on wires. Of course it’s artifice. This is theatre, not nature, and Argene (Ruby Hughes) is a noblewoman, pretending to be a shepherdess as part of her strategy to win Licidas. In a bare rehearsal room, and out of context, it’s even less naturalistic, but Freeman tells the cast that the feelings in the opera are real. They have to play the scene seriously, or the irony is lost. “The audience will only find it funny if we take it completely seriously”. Some great comedians, he adds later, are very serious people: comedy throws tragedy into high relief.

L’Olimpiade’s an Oedipus story, it’s a curse, but when Lycidas comes to kill his father he can’t bring himself to do it. It’s a tragedy but ends up as comic. We have to laugh at the most serious things. It’s extraordinary that the one thing we can rely on in life is that we’re going to die, but it’s the one thing we can’t avoid”. “L’Olimpiade is a comedy, but a comedy for serious characters, not light”, Freeman adds. “It’s a very dramatic and vigorous comedy. People try and commit suicide. It reminds me of Chikamatsu, who created those kabuki double suicide tragedies But in Vivaldi they don’t it follow through”. “What you have to do is make the recitatives work, which is true of Mozart, too. They work like dialogues in a play. You’ve got to play with great clarity. Good singers and actors of course know their text but the hard thing is that you have to learn everyone else’s text so you can react to it”. Characters make drama, whether in a play or in an opera. “An opera without drama is a very long evening indeed”.

WPM$01A7.gifDavid Freeman directing Rosa Bove in rehearsals for Vivaldi L’Olimpiade

In L’Olimpiade, Freeman says there is some “absolutely beautiful music and it’s genuinely touching too. It’s not just pretty tunes. The music cuts pretty deep, even if the plot’s a concoction”. L’ Olimpiade is based on a text by Metastasio which was also used in other operas. Audiences would have had printed texts available, though not sheet music which was expensive to copy, so the plots would not have been wholly unfamiliar. “So there wasn’t the same close relationship between text and music that you get in Mozart or even in Monteverdi". Contemporary audiences might have enjoyed these operas much in the way that popular modern shows string together good tunes around a storyline.

“Another thing about Vivaldi”, says Freeman, “is that we tend to think of baroque as Handel. They were almost direct contemporaries, Vivaldi (1678-1741), Handel (1685-1759). But Handel was a German composer writing in Italian for an English audience, so naturally he didn’t go in for very complicated plots but for rather sublime situations. Vivaldi is different. He’s a Venetian writing for Italians, even in the Venetian dialect, for Venetian audiences, who could understand . So he was able to do a lot more, with text, with comic wit, a lot more madness. So there are more arias, even if they’re shorter, and lots more recitative. So in comparison with Handel who can seem quite noble, Vivaldi might seem more scrappy, but that’s what makes Vivaldi lively”.

Garsington Opera's new premises at Wormsley were designed to combine the countryside setting with good acoustics. "I love the way it seems to float in the open field", says Freeman, "it's surreal". This works particularly well for baroque scale works. Freeman directed A Winter's Tale one of the first plays to be mounted in the Globe theatre in London, a reconstruction of Shakepeare's original theatre. "People said that it proved the primacy of Shakespeare's text, all you need is text. But I thought the opposite. I thought the Globe setting revitalized everything. In a normal theatre, if a pigeon flies in, the audience worries, will it die, or get electrocuted? They get distracted from the play. But in the Globe, if a bird flies in, it's natural, it's just doing what birds do. And the atmosphere at Wormsley rubs off on the operas too. I think it's a triumph".

For more information, please see the Garsington Opera at Wormsley site. (includes cast and production shots)

Anne Ozorio

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):