Subscribe to
Opera Today

Receive articles and news via RSS feeds or email subscription.


twitter_logo[1].gif



9780521746472.png

0810888688.gif

0810882728.gif

Recently in Interviews

Dolora Zajick about her Institute for Young Dramatic Voices

"Although there are now more people on this planet than there have ever been before, there are fewer dramatic voices. Something is wrong with that equation. I thought there needs to be some sort of helping hand so that dramatic voices don’t fall through the cracks in the system as they advance through their various stages of development."

Anna Prohaska, one of Europe’s most promising sopranos

Anna Prohaska sings Sister Constance in Poulenc’s Dialogues des Carmélites at the Royal Opera House. In the same month, she’s also in London to sing a recital with Eric Schneider at the Wigmore Hall, and to sing Henze with Sir Simon Rattle at the Barbican Hall.

Garsington Opera’s 25th anniversary unites its past with its future

Garsington Opera celebrates its 25th anniversary this year.

Jean-Paul Scarpitta in Montpellier

I met with the embattled artistic director of the Opéra et Orchestre National de Montepellier not to talk about his battles. I simply wanted to know the man who had cast and staged a truly extraordinary Mozart/DaPonte trilogy.

Interview: Tenor Saimir Pirgu — From Albania to Italy to LA

Maria Nockin interviews tenor Saimir Pirgu.

Matthew Polenzani — Des Grieux, Manon, Royal Opera House

Matthew Polenzani reprises the role of the Chevalier des Grieux in Jules Massenet’s Manon at the Royal Opera House. “I love coming back to London”, he says, “It’s a very good house and they take care of you as a singer. And the level of music making is unbelievably high”.

Maestro Joseph Rescigno Discusses The Flying Dutchman

The Flying Dutchman is a transitional piece because Wagner was only beginning to establish his style. He took some aspects from Carl Maria von Weber and others from Italian composers like Vincenzo Bellini.

Patricia Racette on Dolores Claiborne

On a personal level, I feel that Dolores is almost like Emmeline grown up. Their circumstances are not exactly parallel, but they are both women at very different points in their lives whose stories involve dilemmas with life-changing outcomes.

Tobias Picker Talks About His New Opera Dolores Claiborne

With the help of Andrew Welch, a London theatrical producer who had adapted several of King’s works for the stage, including this one, I got the rights to both Dolores Claiborne and Misery.

Dolora Zajick on New Opera Written for Her

On September 18, 2013, San Francisco Opera will present the world premiere of Tobias Picker’s opera, Dolores Claiborne, which has a libretto by J. D. McClatchy based on Stephen King’s novel of the same name.

Ermonela Jaho — Singing and Character

Ermonela Jaho caused a sensation at Covent Garden in London five years ago, when she took over Violetta at short notice from Anna Netrebko.

Rossini Maometto Secondo at Garsington Opera - David Parry speaks

Garsington Opera at Wormsley is producing the British premiere of Giacomo Rossini´s Maometto Secondo. Garsington Opera is well-known for its role in reviving Rossini rarities in Britain. Since 1994, there have been 14 productions of 12 Rossini operas, and David Parry has conducted eleven since 2002. He´s very enthusiastic about Maometto Secondo.

Michele Mariotti conducts La donna del lago

Rossini’s La donna del Lago at the Royal Opera House boasts a superstar cast. Joyce DiDonato and Juan Diego Flórez are perhaps the best in these roles in the business at this time. Yet the conductor Michele Mariotti is also hot news.

Kate Lindsey at Glyndebourne

It would seem a logical step for the mezzo-soprano Kate Lindsey to take on the role of the Composer in Richard Strauss’s Ariadne auf Naxos.

Douglas Boyd on Garsington Opera at Wormsley

“Aim for excellence”, says Douglas Boyd, new Artistic Director of Garsington Opera at Wormsley, “and the audience will follow you”.

A Chat with Aida Designer Zandra Rhodes

When I spoke with Zandra Rhodes, she was in her large San Diego workspace, which she described as having walls decorated with her own huge black and white drawings.

An Interview with Virginia Zeani

Palm Beach audiences are famous for their glamour, but in recent years a special star has sparkled amid the jewels, sequins, feathers and furs (whatever the weather).

Bel Canto Queen Jessica Pratt

When the soprano Jessica Pratt first arrived in Italy, she had yet to learn the language or sing in a staged opera.

Michael Spyres: Star Ascendant

When tenor Michael Spyres takes the stage at Carnegie Hall on December 5th, he will be in heady company.

Rewriting the Unwritten Law: Gilliam and Ghent Tackle Damnation

One of the most noteworthy and controversial productions in recent memory arrived in Belgium with hurricane force as Director Terry Gilliam’s inaugural opera, an inspired interpretation of Hector Berlioz’s Le Damnation de Faust, blasted into Ghent, followed by a run in Antwerp.

OPERA TODAY ARCHIVES »

Interviews

David Freeman
26 May 2012

Garsington Opera at Wormsley

Director David Freeman tells why this is an event worth experiencing in the Olympic year.

Vivaldi’s L’Olimpiade At Garsington Opera

An Interview by Anne Ozorio

Above: David Freeman

 

Garsington Opera built its reputation on operatic rarities and baroque in particular. David Freeman has directed all three productions of Vivaldi’s operas here, with baroque specialist Laurence Cummings conducting. “We did L’Incoronazione de Dario, from Vivaldi’s early period, La Verità in cimento (see review) last year, and now L’Olimpiade, from much later. This is probably the finest - we’ve saved best for last”. Though, hopefully there will be more Vivaldi at Garsington Opera at Wormsley. “Vivaldi said he wrote around 70 operas, though some may have been pastiches. We don’t have them all, but there are over 20 that can be done”. “Vivaldi was an extraordinary person, with bright red hair. He was a priest and ran his own opera company where he did everything, composer, producer, music director. His orchestra was all-female, which at the time was very unusual, and the stories around him are lurid” says Freeman.

L’Olimpiade is an Oedipus Rex story says Freeman. An athlete called Megacles competes in the Olympics. The prize is the hand of the princess Aristea. Megacles and Aristea love each other but he’s won under the name of Licidas, his friend, who is in turn loved by Argene. When the King hears about the deception, he banishes Licidas, who then is drawn into a plot to assassinate the King. But Licidas turns out to be the king’s own son, supposedly killed at birth because of a prophecy that he’ll grow up to kill his father. In Vivaldi’s version, the plot resolves with the right pairs of lovers reunited, and Licidas becomes prince. “It seems very complicated”, Freeman adds, “until you see it, and then it all makes sense. A bit like Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night”.

Freeman has directed a lot of Shakespeare, including Twelfth Night. Indeed, he’s a complete man of the theatre, with huge and varied experience. He directed Prokofiev The Fiery Angel at the Royal Opera House, the Kirov and San Francisco, the premiere of Sir Harrison Birtwistle’s The Mask of Orpheus, and Philip Glass’s Akhnaten. He was associated with names like Peter Brook, and founded The Opera Factory which was closely associated with The English National Opera in its “powerhouse” days. He’s also directed mainstream spectacles like Madama Butterfly and Carmen at the Royal Albert Hall. He’s worked in film, too, and is directing a multimedia Handel Messiah in Copenhagen next year.

Garsington-Opera-at-Wormsle.gifGarsington Opera at Wormsley [Photo: Richard Davies]

Thus it was an education to watch him direct a rehearsal of L’Olimpiade. They were doing a scene where Aristea (Rosa Bove) learns that she’s to be married to a stranger. Bove is embracing a toy lamb. The King Clistene (Riccardo Novaro) enters and quietly removes the toy sheep. “She has to grow up now and be married” says Freeman. Novaro deposits the lamb behind a rock, out of Bove’s sight. It’s a small gesture, lasting under a minute, but Freeman shows how it expresses the King’s purposeful nature. “Don’t look at the lamb” Freeman tells Novaro. Clistene isn’t interested in sheep but in his daughter and her coming of age.

At Garsington Opera at Wormlsey, real sheep roam the fields, but inside the auditorium, life size models of sheep move across the stage, pulled on wires. Of course it’s artifice. This is theatre, not nature, and Argene (Ruby Hughes) is a noblewoman, pretending to be a shepherdess as part of her strategy to win Licidas. In a bare rehearsal room, and out of context, it’s even less naturalistic, but Freeman tells the cast that the feelings in the opera are real. They have to play the scene seriously, or the irony is lost. “The audience will only find it funny if we take it completely seriously”. Some great comedians, he adds later, are very serious people: comedy throws tragedy into high relief.

L’Olimpiade’s an Oedipus story, it’s a curse, but when Lycidas comes to kill his father he can’t bring himself to do it. It’s a tragedy but ends up as comic. We have to laugh at the most serious things. It’s extraordinary that the one thing we can rely on in life is that we’re going to die, but it’s the one thing we can’t avoid”. “L’Olimpiade is a comedy, but a comedy for serious characters, not light”, Freeman adds. “It’s a very dramatic and vigorous comedy. People try and commit suicide. It reminds me of Chikamatsu, who created those kabuki double suicide tragedies But in Vivaldi they don’t it follow through”. “What you have to do is make the recitatives work, which is true of Mozart, too. They work like dialogues in a play. You’ve got to play with great clarity. Good singers and actors of course know their text but the hard thing is that you have to learn everyone else’s text so you can react to it”. Characters make drama, whether in a play or in an opera. “An opera without drama is a very long evening indeed”.

WPM$01A7.gifDavid Freeman directing Rosa Bove in rehearsals for Vivaldi L’Olimpiade

In L’Olimpiade, Freeman says there is some “absolutely beautiful music and it’s genuinely touching too. It’s not just pretty tunes. The music cuts pretty deep, even if the plot’s a concoction”. L’ Olimpiade is based on a text by Metastasio which was also used in other operas. Audiences would have had printed texts available, though not sheet music which was expensive to copy, so the plots would not have been wholly unfamiliar. “So there wasn’t the same close relationship between text and music that you get in Mozart or even in Monteverdi". Contemporary audiences might have enjoyed these operas much in the way that popular modern shows string together good tunes around a storyline.

“Another thing about Vivaldi”, says Freeman, “is that we tend to think of baroque as Handel. They were almost direct contemporaries, Vivaldi (1678-1741), Handel (1685-1759). But Handel was a German composer writing in Italian for an English audience, so naturally he didn’t go in for very complicated plots but for rather sublime situations. Vivaldi is different. He’s a Venetian writing for Italians, even in the Venetian dialect, for Venetian audiences, who could understand . So he was able to do a lot more, with text, with comic wit, a lot more madness. So there are more arias, even if they’re shorter, and lots more recitative. So in comparison with Handel who can seem quite noble, Vivaldi might seem more scrappy, but that’s what makes Vivaldi lively”.

Garsington Opera's new premises at Wormsley were designed to combine the countryside setting with good acoustics. "I love the way it seems to float in the open field", says Freeman, "it's surreal". This works particularly well for baroque scale works. Freeman directed A Winter's Tale one of the first plays to be mounted in the Globe theatre in London, a reconstruction of Shakepeare's original theatre. "People said that it proved the primacy of Shakespeare's text, all you need is text. But I thought the opposite. I thought the Globe setting revitalized everything. In a normal theatre, if a pigeon flies in, the audience worries, will it die, or get electrocuted? They get distracted from the play. But in the Globe, if a bird flies in, it's natural, it's just doing what birds do. And the atmosphere at Wormsley rubs off on the operas too. I think it's a triumph".

For more information, please see the Garsington Opera at Wormsley site. (includes cast and production shots)

Anne Ozorio

Send to a friend

Send a link to this article to a friend with an optional message.

Friend's Email Address: (required)

Your Email Address: (required)

Message (optional):